psychodiagnosis

psychodiagnosis

 [si″ko-di″ag-no´sis]
the diagnostic use of psychologic testing.

psy·cho·di·ag·no·sis

(sī'kō-dī'ag-nō'sis),
1. Any method used to discover the factors that underlie behavior, especially maladjusted or abnormal behavior.
2. A subspecialty within clinical psychology that emphasizes the use of psychological tests and techniques for assessing psychopathology.

psychodiagnosis

[-dī′agnō′sis]
Etymology: Gk, psyche, mind, dia + gnosis, knowledge
the study of a personality through observations of behavior and mannerisms combined with various tests.

psy·cho·di·ag·no·sis

(sī'kō-dī'ăg-nō'sis)
1. Any method used to discover the factors that underlie behavior, especially maladjusted or abnormal behavior.
2. A subspecialty within clinical psychology that emphasizes the use of psychological tests and techniques for assessing psychopathology.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pigeonholing women's misery: A history and critical analysis of the psychodiagnosis of women in the twentieth century.
Cultural and linguistic considerations in psychodiagnosis with Hispanics: The need for an empirically informed process model.
Psychodiagnosis outstrips the complexity of other medical fields because of the enormous number of synapses in the central nervous system and the virtually limitless variety of life experiences of each patient.
70) Julie Smart, "Challenges to the Biomedical Model of Disability" (2006-2007) 12 Advances in Medical Psychotherapy and Psychodiagnosis 41 at 41.
Interactive programs such as MORTON and PLATO DCS are even available for psychodiagnosis, although their practicality is limited because only clients comfortable with computer keyboards can use them at present.
2001) Cultural and linguistic considerations in psychodiagnosis with Hispanics: The need for an empirically informed process model.
More specifically, MHC training, affected by shifts in the marketplace (Seiler, 1986), has become more clinically focused, as evidenced by a curriculum including psychodiagnosis, psychopathology, psychopharmacology, and treatment planning (Hershenson & Berger, 2001).
Key words: culture; ethnicity; language; psychodiagnosis
Despite the importance of accurate psychodiagnosis in the delivery of mental health services, empirical research on this topic has been equivocal, and theoretical formulations have been limited (Malgady, Rogler, & Marcos, 1997).