psychobiology


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Related to psychobiology: biopsychology

psychobiology

 [si″ko-bi-ol´o-je]
1. biopsychology; a field of study examining the relationship between brain and mind, studying the effect of biological influences on psychological functioning or mental processes.
2. a psychiatric theory in which the human being is viewed as an integrated unit, incorporating psychological, social, and biological functions, with behavior a function of the total organism. adj., adj psychobiolog´ical.

psy·cho·bi·ol·o·gy

(sī'kō-bī-ol'ŏ-jē),
1. The study of the interrelationships of the biology and psychology in cognitive functioning, including intellectual, memory, and related neurocognitive processes.
2. Adolf Meyer's term for psychiatry.

psychobiology

/psy·cho·bi·ol·o·gy/ (-bi-ol´ŏ-je)
1. biopsychology; a field of study examining the relationship between brain and mind, studying the effect of biological influences on psychological functioning or mental processes.
2. a psychiatric theory in which the human being is viewed as an integrated unit, incorporating psychological, social, and biological functions, with behavior a function of the total organism.psychobiolog´ical

psychobiology

(sī′kō-bī-ŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The branch of psychology that studies the biological foundations of behavior, emotions, and mental processes. Also called biopsychology.

psy′cho·bi′o·log′ic (-bī′ə-lŏj′ĭk), psy′cho·bi′o·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
psy′cho·bi′o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
psy′cho·bi·ol′o·gist n.

psychobiology

[-bī′ol′əjē]
Etymology: Gk, psyche + bios, life, logos, science
1 the study of biochemical foundations of thought, mood, emotion, affect, and behavior.
2 personality development and functioning in terms of the interaction of the body and the mind.
3 a school of psychiatric thought introduced by Adolf Meyer that stresses total life experience, including biological, emotional, and sociocultural factors, in assessing the psychological makeup or mental status of an individual. psychobiological, adj.

psychobiology

Psychiatry A school of thought that views a person's biologic, psychologic, and social experiences as an integrated unit

psy·cho·bi·ol·o·gy

(sī'kō-bī-ol'ŏ-jē)
The study of the interrelationships of biology and psychology in cognitive functioning, including intellectual, memory, and related neurocognitive processes.
References in periodicals archive ?
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This introductory psychobiology text reflects the love of comics shared by Aleixo, a psychology instructor at unspecified British universities, and Baillon, a British illustrator who majored in psychology.
She earned a bachelor of arts in psychobiology, a master of science in science education with Pennsylvania teaching certificates in biology and general science, and a PhD in measurement, evaluation, and techniques of experimental research from University of Pennsylvania.