psychobiology

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psychobiology

 [si″ko-bi-ol´o-je]
1. biopsychology; a field of study examining the relationship between brain and mind, studying the effect of biological influences on psychological functioning or mental processes.
2. a psychiatric theory in which the human being is viewed as an integrated unit, incorporating psychological, social, and biological functions, with behavior a function of the total organism. adj., adj psychobiolog´ical.

psy·cho·bi·ol·o·gy

(sī'kō-bī-ol'ŏ-jē),
1. The study of the interrelationships of the biology and psychology in cognitive functioning, including intellectual, memory, and related neurocognitive processes.
2. Adolf Meyer's term for psychiatry.

psychobiology

/psy·cho·bi·ol·o·gy/ (-bi-ol´ŏ-je)
1. biopsychology; a field of study examining the relationship between brain and mind, studying the effect of biological influences on psychological functioning or mental processes.
2. a psychiatric theory in which the human being is viewed as an integrated unit, incorporating psychological, social, and biological functions, with behavior a function of the total organism.psychobiolog´ical

psychobiology

(sī′kō-bī-ŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The branch of psychology that studies the biological foundations of behavior, emotions, and mental processes. Also called biopsychology.

psy′cho·bi′o·log′ic (-bī′ə-lŏj′ĭk), psy′cho·bi′o·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
psy′cho·bi′o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
psy′cho·bi·ol′o·gist n.

psychobiology

[-bī′ol′əjē]
Etymology: Gk, psyche + bios, life, logos, science
1 the study of biochemical foundations of thought, mood, emotion, affect, and behavior.
2 personality development and functioning in terms of the interaction of the body and the mind.
3 a school of psychiatric thought introduced by Adolf Meyer that stresses total life experience, including biological, emotional, and sociocultural factors, in assessing the psychological makeup or mental status of an individual. psychobiological, adj.

psychobiology

Psychiatry A school of thought that views a person's biologic, psychologic, and social experiences as an integrated unit

psy·cho·bi·ol·o·gy

(sī'kō-bī-ol'ŏ-jē)
The study of the interrelationships of biology and psychology in cognitive functioning, including intellectual, memory, and related neurocognitive processes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ferrami is really onto something in her work, but it doesn't take a psychobiologist to figure out that much sooner than later she's going to be stopped in her tracks for committing the ultimate mystery genre trespass: threatening to uncover some malicious plot or experiment.
Breslin, a sensory psychobiologist at the Monell Center.
This significant report not only demonstrates for the first time an association between variants of the OB gene and measures of obesity and mood in humans, it also exemplifies the importance of examining the interactive effects of distinct, seemingly disparate genes on complex behavioral traits," writes psychobiologist Gerald J.
Kraemer, a developmental psychobiologist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, says the NIH team's "highly significant findings" support the theory that early experiences influence the physiological development of the brain, shaping its reaction to alcohol later in life.
Judith Shulevitz in The New Republic, reports that recent research by psychobiologists shows that human loneliness sends misleading hormonal signals, rejiggers the molecules on genes that govern behavior, and wrenches a slew of other systems out of whack.
Thirty years ago, students of the brain might have identified themselves as anatomists, physiologists, or psychobiologists, but today they would consider themselves neuroscientists.
But with psychobiologists on our team, we know that it is not just the media that are to blame--that there is another piece to the puzzle.
applies Charles Darwin's theory of evolution, with generous and detailed references to scientists, psychobiologists and anthropologists.