psychobiology

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psychobiology

 [si″ko-bi-ol´o-je]
1. biopsychology; a field of study examining the relationship between brain and mind, studying the effect of biological influences on psychological functioning or mental processes.
2. a psychiatric theory in which the human being is viewed as an integrated unit, incorporating psychological, social, and biological functions, with behavior a function of the total organism. adj., adj psychobiolog´ical.

psy·cho·bi·ol·o·gy

(sī'kō-bī-ol'ŏ-jē),
1. The study of the interrelationships of the biology and psychology in cognitive functioning, including intellectual, memory, and related neurocognitive processes.
2. Adolf Meyer's term for psychiatry.

psychobiology

/psy·cho·bi·ol·o·gy/ (-bi-ol´ŏ-je)
1. biopsychology; a field of study examining the relationship between brain and mind, studying the effect of biological influences on psychological functioning or mental processes.
2. a psychiatric theory in which the human being is viewed as an integrated unit, incorporating psychological, social, and biological functions, with behavior a function of the total organism.psychobiolog´ical

psychobiology

(sī′kō-bī-ŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The branch of psychology that studies the biological foundations of behavior, emotions, and mental processes. Also called biopsychology.

psy′cho·bi′o·log′ic (-bī′ə-lŏj′ĭk), psy′cho·bi′o·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
psy′cho·bi′o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
psy′cho·bi·ol′o·gist n.

psychobiology

[-bī′ol′əjē]
Etymology: Gk, psyche + bios, life, logos, science
1 the study of biochemical foundations of thought, mood, emotion, affect, and behavior.
2 personality development and functioning in terms of the interaction of the body and the mind.
3 a school of psychiatric thought introduced by Adolf Meyer that stresses total life experience, including biological, emotional, and sociocultural factors, in assessing the psychological makeup or mental status of an individual. psychobiological, adj.

psychobiology

Psychiatry A school of thought that views a person's biologic, psychologic, and social experiences as an integrated unit

psy·cho·bi·ol·o·gy

(sī'kō-bī-ol'ŏ-jē)
The study of the interrelationships of biology and psychology in cognitive functioning, including intellectual, memory, and related neurocognitive processes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Psychobiological and neuroimaging research points to alcohol-related changes in brain volume and function and in biological stress responses.
The 'Trier Social Stress Test'--a tool for investigating psychobiological stress responses in a laboratory setting.
Additionally, it was noted that this book distinguished itself from others in the genre because its narratives were unmediated--not sanitized by professional, psychobiological, medical commentaries.
The Two General Activation Systems of Affect: Structural Findings, Evolutionary Considerations, and Psychobiological Evidence.
If recovery is not complete, then the psychobiological systems will remain activated and not return to baseline levels (Ursin, 1980).
3) psychobiological reactions to the loss ("What emotions did you experience?
These differences suggest that regular exercise induces psychobiological changes which mediate the affective response to acute bouts of vigorous exercise, which may in turn influence future exercise adherence.
In addition to such material factors, contexts characterized by low income and other aspects of deprivation are associated with psychosocial stressors that induce their own psychobiological stress responses.
Positive affect and psychobiological processes relevant to health.
Beyond specificity: effects of serotonin and serotonergic treatments on psychobiological dysfunction.
From recent functional imaging studies, it becomes clear that placebo effects are genuine psychobiological events occurring in responders treated with either active drug or placebo.
The assertion that such complicated anatomical processes as human behaviors can be meaningfully studied as the result of genetic selection has been contested by neuroscientists who argue that the adult human's brain/mind is such an enormously complex developmental assemblage that "the chasm from genes to final psychobiological product cannot be credibly bridged through any form of genetic determinism, especially in humans" ( Panksepp & Panksepp, 2000, p.