psychoacoustics

(redirected from psychoacoustical)
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psy·cho·a·cous·tics

(sī'kō-ă-kūs'tiks),
1. A discipline combining experimental psychology and physics that deals with the physical features of sound as related to audition, as well as with the physiology and psychology of sound receptor processes.
2. The science pertaining to the psychological factors that influence one's awareness of sound.
[psycho- + G. akoustikos, relating to hearing]

psychoacoustics

/psy·cho·acous·tics/ (si″ko-ah-kldbomacs´tiks) a branch of psychophysics studying the relationship between acoustic stimuli and behavior.

psychoacoustics

(sī′kō-ə-ko͞o′stĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The scientific study of the perception of sound.

psy′cho·a·cous′tic, psy′cho·a·cous′ti·cal adj.

psychoacoustics

[sī′kō·əko̅o̅s′tiks]
the branch of science concerned with the physical features of sound as it relates to the psychological and physiological aspects of the sense of hearing in the unimpaired ear.

psy·cho·a·cous·tics

(sī'kō-ă-kūs'tiks)
1. A discipline combining experimental psychology and physics that deals with the physical features of sound as related to audition and the physiology and psychology of sound receptor processes.
2. Science involving the psychological factors that influence one's awareness of sound.
[psycho- + G. akoustikos, relating to hearing]
References in periodicals archive ?
Bose researchers found that these triple amplification systems introduce numerous acoustical and psychoacoustical problems:
The Institut was formed "in order to integrate the musical, theoretical and psychoacoustical research of bases as a scientific foundament [sic] into the education at the Hoch-schule 'Mozarteum.
However, Gabor had anticipated most of the relevant psychoacoustical notions discussed in Moles's Th[acute{e}]orie de l'Information et Perception Esth[acute{e}]tique (Paris: Flammarion, 1958).
Terhardt, "Pitch, Consonance, and Harmony," Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 55 (1974): 1061-1069; Richard Parncutt, Harmony: A Psychoacoustical Approach (Berlin: Springer-Verlag, 1989).
Most of the then-current psychoacoustical representations of musical pitch - including those of Helmholtz (1863), Mach (1906), and Koffka (1935)(16) - shared a general tendency to conceive of pitch as a one-dimensional attribute of sound.