psychic pain

psychic pain

Etymology: Gk, psyche, mind; L, poena, penalty
a functional pain that, in the absence of any organic cause, is usually associated with feelings of acute anxiety. In some cases, the person may experience hallucinations or obsessions. Also called psychalgia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Teens and adults who want to learn lasting emotional power and unlock psychic pain now have a process that can do this every time without redirecting one's emotional state through faulty psychological techniques.
However, when others rely on you for direction, guidance, fair and balanced feedback, and a workplace free from enduring confusion and psychic pain, you, as a leader, must manage how your expressions affect others.
According to the Courier Mail, he said that the usual feelings of hopelessness and unbearable psychic pain, along with self-absorption and restriction of options in those who are suicidal, are the antithesis of terrorist acts.
Was she seeking transient relief from psychic pain, without intent to cause harm?
Depression, psychic pain, alerts you to the fact that you have a problem, stops business as usual, focuses your attention, and can provide a signaling function that you need help," says Thomson.
Where is psychic pain so indescribable that coping with it looks like a slide into alternative reality?
The placeless dream has the "danger of underplaying if not denying the psychic pain of the migration process and the persistence of the past in the present," said Mr.
The searing psychic pain of Aids sufferers may be best expressed in the poem, Discrimination: "Why do you accuse me?
In the title story, the son of Holocaust survivors empathizes with the torture his parents must have experienced when he undergoes a series of agonizing dental procedures; hence referred pain becomes a metaphor for these fictional characters trapped by their own psychic pain.
With his new album, ``Blinking Lights and Other Revelations,'' a double album meditating on life's biggest questions (with a new teen dance craze thrown in for good measure), Everett may have outdone himself, unreeling psychic pain and unbridled joy simultaneously.
Kidder comments, "It was as if in seeking out suffering in some of the world's most desperate locales, he made himself immune to the self-consuming varieties of psychic pain.