psychic infection

psychic infection

Etymology: Gk, psyche + L, inficere, to stain
the spread of psychic effects or influences on others on a small scale, as in folie à deux, or on a large scale, as in the dance and witch manias of the Middle Ages or the spread of hysteria or panic in a crowd. Also called psychic contagion. See also sympathy.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Heaven's Gate incident at Rancho Santa Fe in California is a prime example of psychic infection, or induced psychosis.
We see psychic infection with other people who live in very close contact with each other, including married couples of long standing, brothers and sisters, and small religious groups in close proximity.
But the greater understanding the public has of the phenomenon of psychic infection and cultism, the more apt it is to avoid such deadly and inhumane contacts.