psychiatry


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psychiatry

 [si-ki´ah-tre]
the branch of health science that deals with the study, treatment, and prevention of mental disorders. adj., adj psychiat´ric.
biological psychiatry that which emphasizes biochemical, pharmacological, and neurological causes and treatment approaches.
community psychiatry the branch of psychiatry concerned with the detection, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders in a designated geographical area, with emphasis on environmental factors.
descriptive psychiatry psychiatry based on the study of observable symptoms and behavioral phenomena, rather than underlying psychodynamic processes.
dynamic psychiatry psychiatry based on the study of the mental mechanisms and emotional processes that govern and motivate human behavior, rather than observable behavioral phenomena.
forensic psychiatry that dealing with the legal aspects of mental disorders.
geriatric psychiatry geropsychiatry.
preventive psychiatry a broad term referring to the amelioration, control, and limitation of psychiatric disability.
social psychiatry that concerned with the cultural and social factors that engender, precipitate, intensify, or prolong maladaptive patterns of behavior and complicate treatment.

psy·chi·a·try

(sī-kī'ă-trē),
1. The medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders.
2. For some types of psychiatry not listed below, see also subentries under therapy, psychotherapy, psychoanalysis.
Synonym(s): psychiatrics
[psych- + G. iatreia, medical treatment]

psychiatry

/psy·chi·a·try/ (si-ki´ah-tre) the branch of medicine dealing with the study, treatment, and prevention of mental disorders.psychiat´ric
biological psychiatry  that which emphasizes physical, chemical, and neurological causes and treatment approaches.
community psychiatry  that concerned with the detection, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders as they develop within designated psychosocial, cultural, or geographical areas.
descriptive psychiatry  that based on the study of observable symptoms and behavioral phenomena, rather than underlying psychodynamic processes.
dynamic psychiatry  that based on the study of emotional processes, their origins, and the mental mechanisms underlying them, rather than observable behavioral phenomena.
forensic psychiatry  that dealing with the legal aspects of mental disorders.
geriatric psychiatry  geropsychiatry.
preventive psychiatry  that broadly concerned with the amelioration, control, and limitation of psychiatric disability.
social psychiatry  that concerned with the cultural and social factors that engender, precipitate, intensify, or prolong maladaptive patterns of behavior and complicate treatment.

psychiatry

(sĭ-kī′ə-trē, sī-)
n.
The branch of medicine that deals with the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of mental and emotional disorders.

psy′chi·at′ric (sī′kē-ăt′rĭk), psy′chi·at′ri·cal (-rĭ-kəl) adj.
psy′chi·at′ri·cal·ly adv.

psychiatry

[sīkī′ətrē]
Etymology: Gk, psyche + iatreia, treatment
the branch of medical science that deals with the causes, treatment, and prevention of mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders. Some kinds of psychiatry are community psychiatry, descriptive psychiatry, dynamic psychiatry, existential psychiatry, forensic psychiatry, and orthopsychiatry. psychiatric, adj.

psychiatry

The medical specialty concerned with physical and chemical interactions in the brain and how they affect mental and emotional processes; the study, treatment, and prevention of mental illness. See Consultation-liaison psychiatry, Forensic psychiatry, Geriatric psychiatry, Neuropsychiatry, Orthomolecular psychiatry, Orthopsychiatry.

psy·chi·a·try

(sī-kī'ă-trē)
The medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders.
[psych- + G. iatreia, medical treatment]

psychiatry

The branch of medicine concerned with the management of mental illness and emotional and behavioural problems. Compare PSYCHOLOGY.

psychiatry (sīˈ·kīˑ··trē),

n the modern medical specialty that focuses on understanding; diagnosing; and treating emotional, mental, and behavioral dysfunctions or disorders.

psy·chi·a·try

, psychiatrics (sī-kī'ă-trē, sīkē-atriks)
Medical specialty concerned with diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders.
[psych- + G. iatreia, medical treatment]

psychiatry,

n the branch of medical science that deals with the causes, treatment, and prevention of mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders.
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