book scorpion

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book scorpion

a member of the order Chelonethida of the Arachnida class. Called also false scorpion.
References in periodicals archive ?
Invertebrates observed in these caves included crustaceans (16 species), pseudoscorpions (2 species), spiders (7), millipedes (8), a dipluran (1), psocopteran (1), collembolans (18), beetles (22), and flies (6).
When morphology misleads: interpopulation uniformity in sexual selection masks genetic divergence in harlequin beetle-riding pseudoscorpion populations.
This pseudoscorpion was described as Microcreagis ozarkensis by Hoff (1945) from specimens collected from Devil's Den State Park and Farmington, Washington County, Arkansas (Hoff 1945).
The purpose of my study at The Morton Arboretum in Lisle, Illinois, was to evaluate the effect of prescribed burning on spiders, pseudoscorpions, and the leaf litter in which they live.
The present distributions of the Tooth Cave spider (Neoleptoneta myopica), the Tooth Cave pseudoscorpion (Tartarocreagris texana), and the Tooth Cave ground beetle (Rhadine persephone) are confined to Williamson and Travis Counties in central Texas (Figure 1).
Despite their great age, the Devonian pseudoscorpions do not seem primitive compared with modern species, according to Shear.
Correspondingly, the fossil record is biased against mites, harvestmen, pseudoscorpions and solifuges.
We found records for a total of 15 pseudoscorpion species (six genera in three families) reported from colonies of three stingless bee species and two honey bee species (Table 1).
The Chernetidae are the largest pseudoscorpion family with 112 genera and more than 650 valid species.
The distribution of the pseudoscorpions in the different components of the nests is analyzed.
Keywords: Pseudoscorpions, Mexico, Cuba, taxonomy, morphology, new species, biospeleology, troglobite
All life-history stages of the small arachnids have been found in packrat nests, indicating at least a commensalistic relationship exists, whereby the pseudoscorpion benefits from shelter and food found in the nests, and reproduces there as well.