pseudosarcomatous

pseudosarcomatous

/pseu·do·sar·co·ma·tous/ (-sahr-ko´mah-tus) mimicking sarcoma; used of both benign and malignant lesions that histologically resemble sarcoma.
References in periodicals archive ?
4] Because of its histological heterogeneity, it has received many names over the past years, including plasma cell pseudotumor, inflammatory pseudotumor, xanthomatous pseudotumor, pseudosarcomatous myofibroblastic proliferation, inflammatory myofibrohistiocytic proliferation, atypical fibromyxoid tumor and atypical myofibroblastic tumour.
It was first described as a distinct entity by Konwaler et al in 1955; they called it pseudosarcomatous fibromatosis.
Over time, these myofibroblastic proliferations have had a number of designations, such as inflammatory pseudotumor, inflammatory pseudosarcomatous fibromyxoid tumor, pseudosarcomatous myofibroblastic tumor, fibromyxoid pseudotumor, plasma cell granuloma, plasma cell pseudotumor, and xanthomatous pseudotumour.
Carcinoma of the breast with pseudosarcomatous metaplasia.
This lesion is also known as a plasma cell granuloma, myofibroblastoma, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, and xanthomatous pseudotumor, and it occurs as the result of an inflammatory myofibroblastic proliferation and a pseudosarcomatous fibroinflammatory process.
Occasionally, fibroepithelial stromal polyps exhibit sarcomatous features including increased cellularity, cytologic atypia, increased mitotic rate (>10 mitoses per 10 high-power fields), and atypical mitoses and are termed pseudosarcomatous fibroepithelial stromal polyps.
Sarcomatoid carcinoma should be distinguished from the rare carcinoma with metaplastic, benign-appearing bone or cartilage in the stroma or those showing other pseudosarcomatous stromal reactions.
The various terminologies (sarcomatoid carcinoma, carcinosarcoma, pseudosarcoma, pseudosarcomatous squamous cell carcinoma, spindle cell carcinoma, and polypoid carcinoma) reflect the uncertain histogenesis of this tumor.
It was first described in 1955 by Konwaler et al, who called the lesion subcutaneous pseudosarcomatous fibromatosis, t In the early 1960s, the disease became known as nodular fasciitis; other terms used in the literature include proliferative fasciitis, infiltrative fasciitis, productive fasciitis, subcutaneous fibromatosis, and nodular fibrositis.
3) A high index of suspicion is important, but other types of fibromatosis and other types of lesions must also be considered, including pseudosarcomatous fasciitis, fibrous dysplasia, ossifying fibroma, or the highly malignant fibrosarcoma.
40,41) One sees a core of fatty or hyalinized tissue admixed with pleomorphic stellate or fusiform cells, like those of pleomorphic lipoma, pleomorphic fibroma, vaginal pseudosarcomatous polyps, and some true sarcomas of deep soft tissue (Figure 5, A and B).