pseudoparalysis


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pseudoparalysis

 [soo″do-pah-ral´ĭ-sis]
apparent loss of muscular power without real paralysis.
Parrot's pseudoparalysis (syphilitic pseudoparalysis) pseudoparalysis of one or more extremities in infants, due to syphilitic osteochondritis of an epiphysis.

pseu·do·pa·ral·y·sis

(sū'dō-pă-ral'i-sis),
Apparent paralysis due to voluntary inhibition of motion because of pain, incoordination, or other cause, but without actual paralysis.
Synonym(s): pseudoparesis (1)

pseudoparalysis

/pseu·do·pa·ral·y·sis/ (-pah-ral´ĭ-sis) apparent loss of muscular power without real paralysis.
Parrot's pseudoparalysis , syphilitic pseudoparalysis pseudoparalysis of one or more limbs in infants, due to syphilitic osteochondritis of an epiphysis.

pseudoparalysis

(so͞o′dō-pə-răl′ĭ-sĭs)
n.
A voluntary restriction or inhibition of motion because of pain, incoordination, or other cause, not due to actual muscular paralysis.

pseudoparalysis

[-pəral′isis]
a condition in which a person appears to be unable to move the arms or legs but has no "true" paralysis. In infants, the condition may be caused by pain in joints resulting from a disease such as rickets or scurvy.

pseudoparalysis

(1) Hysterical paralysis, see there.
(2) A rarely used term for a paralysis-like state due to a loss of joint sensation.

pseu·do·pa·ral·y·sis

(sū'dō-păr-al'i-sis)
Apparent paralysis due to voluntary inhibition of motion because of pain, to incoordination, or other cause, but without actual paralysis.
Synonym(s): pseudoparesis (1) .

pseudoparalysis

apparent loss of muscular power without real paralysis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Brachial plexus injuries have a greater chance of association with clavicle and humerus fractures, as seen in our three cases of clavicle fracture with pseudoparalysis, probably because of similarities in the mechanism of all three injury types.
Symptoms include rhinitis, jaundice, vesicular or bullous rash, hepatosplenomegaly, osteochondritis, pseudoparalysis, thrombocytopenia, leukocytosis, and hemolytic anemia.
Streptococcus, Staphylococcus or Haemophilus influenzae bacteria infecting the hip or knee can result in painful, localized pseudoparalysis.
Later clinical findings of congenital syphilis include frontal bossing, shortened maxillae and relative mandibular prominence, saddle nose deformity, high palatal arch, Hutchinson's teeth (dysmorphic upper central incisors), interstitial keratitis, mulberry (polycuspid first lower) molars, eighth nerve deafness, and saber shins and osteochondritis of long bones, which may lead to pseudoparalysis.
In summary, subscapularis failure in aTSA is a significant problem and can result in instability, pseudoparalysis, and compromised glenoid component fixation due to uneven forces applied to the glenoid component.
section]) Signs of CS (usually in an infant or child aged <2 years) include the following: condyloma lata, snuffles, syphilitic skin rash, hepatosplenomegaly, jaundice from syphilitic hepatitis, pseudoparalysis, or edema (nephrotic syndrome and/or malnutrition).
Although the disease is less common in the first 2 years of life, infants are most likely to present with it when pseudoparalysis or localized swelling caused by a ruptured periosteum brings them to the physician, Dr.
Dagger2)Signs in an infant ([less than] 2 years of age) may include hepatosplenomegaly, characteristic skin rash, condyloma lata, snuffles, jaundice (syphilitic hepatitis), pseudoparalysis, or edema (nephrotic syndrome).
Indications for the combined LD-TM transfer include patients with irreparable rotator cuff tears, pseudoparalysis, pain, and loss of active external rotation on clinical exam.
As surgeons have gained more experience, indications have been expanded to include revision arthroplasty, inflammatory arthropathy with a massive rotator cuff tear, (30) painful and irreparable rotator cuff tears, proximal humeral nonunion or malunion, (36) acute fractures, (36,37) tumor, (38) and chronic pseudoparalysis without arthritis.