pseudohyperkalemia

pseu·do·hy·per·kal·e·mi·a

(sū'dō-hī'pĕr-kal-ē'mē-ă),
A spurious elevation of the serum concentration of potassium occurring when potassium is released in vitro from cells in a blood sample collected for a potassium measurement. This may be a consequence of disease (that is, myeloproliferative disorders with marked leukocytosis or thrombocytosis) or as a result of improper collection technique with in vitro hemolysis.
[pseudo + G. hyper, above + L. kalium, potassium, G. haima, blood]

pseudohyperkalemia

[-hī′pərkəlē′mē·ə]
a laboratory artifact indicating an elevated blood potassium level caused by potassium released in vitro from cells in the blood sample.

pseudohyperkalemia

Lab medicine An in vitro phenomenon seen in megakaryocytic hyperplasia, thrombocytosis, leukocytosis, or myeloproliferative disease, where rapid clotting of blood releases potassium from RBCs Lab ↑ Serum K+, plasma K+ is normal. Cf Hyperkalemia.

pseu·do·hy·per·ka·le·mi·a

(sū'dō-hī'pĕr-kă-lē'mē-ă)
A spurious elevation of the serum concentration of potassium, occurring when potassium is released in vitro from cells in a blood sample collected for a potassium measurement. May be a consequence of disease (i.e., myeloproliferative disorders with marked leukocytosis or thrombocytosis) or result from an improper collection technique with in vitro hemolysis.
Synonym(s): pseudohyperkalaemia.
[pseudo + G. hyper, above + L. kalium, potassium, G. haima, blood]

pseudohyperkalemia

elevated levels of serum potassium resulting from an increased release from cells during clotting of the sample. Associated with thrombocytosis, extreme leukocytosis, or abnormal white or red blood cells.
References in periodicals archive ?
Continued monitoring demonstrated that this program was successful in substantially lowering the incidence of pseudohyperkalemia across the institution.
Pseudohyperkalemia caused by fist clenching during phlebotomy.
First, pseudohyperkalemia (or factitious hyperkalemia) should be excluded.
Prior to running a specimen for a potassium level, there are causes that can create a factitious or pseudohyperkalemia reading, it is important to recognize these factors.
In the absence of marked leukocytosis and thrombocythemia, pseudohyperkalemia is very unlikely.
In the article, "Investigating elevated potassium values" (MLO, November 2006, page 24), little was presented to explain a case of pseudohyperkalemia that we experienced recently.
Combined pseudohyperkalemia and pseudohypocalcemia have not been previously reported in the clinical setting.
Pseudohyperkalemia is commonly attributed to the release of potassium from platelets during coagulation in serum; however, since the pseudohyperkalemia was in plasma and the platelet count was below normal, this was an unlikely cause.
Conversely, pseudohyperkalemia can elevate an abnormally low potassium, masking a real illness such as:
We describe a case of "reverse" pseudohyperkalemia in a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) in whom potassium concentrations in plasma specimens exceeded concentrations observed in serum by more than 1.
Following a change in the supplier of collection tubes, however, we observed an increase in the frequency of pseudohyperkalemia, which prompted a formal evaluation of the serumplasma difference and the effect of different tube types.
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