pseudoexfoliation syndrome

pseudoexfoliation syndrome

a condition, often leading to glaucoma, in which deposits on the surface of the lens resemble exfoliation of the lens capsule.
See also: pseudoexfoliation of lens capsule.

pseu·do·ex·fo·li·at·ion syn·drome

(sū'dō-eks-fō'lē-ā'shŭn sin'drōm)
A condition, often leading to glaucoma, in which deposits on the surface of the lens resemble exfoliation of the lens capsule.
References in periodicals archive ?
They address pediatric cases, congenital subluxation of the crystalline lens, cataracts and glaucoma, pseudoexfoliation syndrome, phacoemulsifications with a small pupil, cataract surgery in age-related macular degeneration, brunescent cataract, and cataracts in high myopia, severe hyperopia, and retinitis pigmentosa.
Pseudoexfoliation syndrome (PEXS) is an age-related disorder of the extracellular matrix and is frequently associated with severe chronic secondary open-angle glaucoma and cataract (1).
Ocular hemodynamics in pseudoexfoliation syndrome and pseudoexfoliation glaucoma.
Her areas of special interest include Pseudoexfoliation Syndrome and Ocular Surface Disease.
In pseudoexfoliation syndrome, material on the lens and throughout the anterior chamber of the eye can clog up the drainage channels and cause pressure to elevate.
Ophthalmologists are urged to consider the possibility of hearing loss in patients with ocular pseudoexfoliation syndrome and guide them to additional medical care as needed.
Pseudoexfoliation syndrome (PEX) is an age related, generalized disorder of the extracellular matrix characterized by the multifocal production and progressive accumulation of a fibrillar extracellular material in intra- and extraocular tissue, which is the result of either an excessive production or insufficient breakdown or both (1).
Increased oxidative stress in patients with pseudoexfoliation syndrome.
In Pseudoexfoliation Syndrome, increased pigmentation of the trabecular meshwork can be seen, especially inferiorly.
Pseudoexfoliation syndrome and pigment dispersion syndrome (Figure 3) are risk factors for the forms of OAG known as pseudoexfoliative and pigmentary glaucoma, respectively.
40) A large study involving over 3,000 subjects compared optic disc size in the eyes of those classified as normal to those with OAG, OHT, or pseudoexfoliation syndrome.
a) Pseudoexfoliation syndrome b) Pigment dispersion syndrome c) Iris cysts d) Previous trabeculectomy