pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia

pseu·do·ep·i·the·li·om·a·tous hy·per·pla·si·a

, pseudocarcinomatous hyperplasia
a benign marked increase and downgrowth of epidermal cells, observed in chronic inflammatory dermatoses and over some dermal neoplasms and nevi; microscopically, it resembles well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma.

pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia

A nonspecific reactive hyperplasia of stratified mucocutaneous epithelia, which simulates squamous cell carcinoma and may be seen overlying infections (e.g., abscesses, Blastomyces dermatitidis, granuloma inguinale, granular cell tumours, inflammation) adjacent to ulcer margins and in scars, burns and irritation.

pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia(PEH), (soo´dōep´ithēlēōmətus hī´purplā´zēə, -zhə),

n a type of epithelial hyperplasia associated with chronic inflammatory response; distinguished from squamous cell carcinoma by the lack of dysplastic cytologic characteristics.

pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia

hyperkeratosis resembling an epithelioma.
References in periodicals archive ?
Microscopic description Reese and Colclasure, 1975 (5) Pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia and granulomatous inflammation Smallman et al, 1989 (4) Pseudoepitheliomators hyperplasia and granulomatous inflammation Browning et al, 1992 (7) Granulomatous inflammation Isaacson and Frable, 1996 (6) Pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia and granulomatous inflammation McGregor et al, 2003 Pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia, granulomatous inflammation, and mild acute inflammation Series (ref.
The histologic findings after review were ulceration and granulation tissue formation, granuloma, multinucleated giant cells with many intracytoplasmic LeishmanDonovan bodies, numerous multinucleated giant cells, severe lymphoplasma cells, infiltrating perineural tissue and muscles, pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia with keratin pearls, lymphoid aggregation in the submucosal area, lymphoid aggregation between skeletal muscles, and massive infiltration of macrophages loaded with Leishman-Donovan bodies in submucosal areas of oral (Figure 3), nasal, and respiratory epithelium.
The overlying nonkeratinizing squamous epithelium was unremarkable and lacked pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia.
Immediately overlying the mass, the epithelium demonstrates pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia in most cases (figure 1).
This process, termed pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia (PEH; or pseudocarcinomatous hyperplasia), is potentially associated with organoid nevi, nonhealing ulcers, chronic dermatitides, reactions to underlying neoplasms, and selected infections of the skin.
Pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia of the overlying squamous mucosa is commonly present when the lesion involves the palate.
In an attempt at re-epithelialization, necrotizing sialometaplasia may induce pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia, and this reaction may be so strilting that distinguishing it from squamous cell carcinoma and mucoepidermoid carcinoma may be difficult.
To our knowledge, this is the first case to be reported with such an association and may raise new questions about the significance of pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia commonly seen with GCTs at various body sites.
2,18] In our patient, the histopathologic findings were associated with these characteristics in both the subcutaneous cervical tumor and the laryngeal tumor, but pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia was not observed.
Correlation with clinical findings and history is essential to avoid misdiagnosing HLE as squamous neoplasia or other lichenoid interface dermatitides with pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia.
The immediately adjacent epithelium will frequently show pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia, while the ulcer bed contains granulation tissue (figure 2).