pseudocyst


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Related to pseudocyst: Pancreatic pseudocyst, pancreatic abscess

pseudocyst

 [soo´do-sist]
1. an abnormal or dilated cavity resembling a true cyst but not lined with epithelium; called also adventitious or false cyst.
2. a cystic collection of fluid and necrotic debris whose walls are formed by the pancreas and other surrounding organs. It occurs as a complication of acute pancreatitis and may subside spontaneously or become secondarily infected and develop into an abscess.
3. a cluster of small comma-shaped forms of Toxoplasma gondii, sometimes containing thousands of organisms within an irregular wall; it represents a resting stage, as opposed to the active, motile stage. Pseudocysts are found in the tissues, especially muscles and the brain, in chronic (latent) toxoplasmosis.

pseu·do·cyst

(sū'dō-sist),
1. An accumulation of fluid in a cystlike loculus, but without an epithelial or other membranous lining.
See also: bradyzoite. Synonym(s): adventitious cyst, false cyst
2. A cyst the wall of which is formed by a host cell and not by a parasite.
See also: bradyzoite.
3. A mass of 50 or more Toxoplasma bradyzoites, found within a host cell, frequently in the brain; formerly called a pseudocyst, but now considered a true cyst enclosed in its own membrane within the host cell that may rupture to release particles that form new cysts, and apparently is infective to another vertebrate host.
See also: bradyzoite.
[pseudo- + G. kystis, bladder]

pseudocyst

/pseu·do·cyst/ (soo´do-sist)
1. an abnormal or dilated space resembling a cyst but not lined with epithelium.
2. a complication of acute pancreatitis, characterized by a cystic collection of fluid and necrotic debris whose walls are formed by the pancreas and surrounding organs.
3. a cluster of small, comma-shaped forms of Toxoplasma gondii found particularly in muscle and brain tissue in toxoplasmosis.

pseudocyst

[so̅o̅′dəsist]
Etymology: Gk, pseudes + kystis, bag
a space or cavity containing gas or liquid but without a lining membrane. Pseudocysts commonly occur after pancreatitis when digestive juices break through the normal ducts of the pancreas and collect in spaces lined by fibroblasts and surfaces of adjacent organs. Symptoms are caused by displacement of abdominal structures or fluid or by atelectasis at the base of the left lung. Ultrasound and computed tomography are useful in diagnosis; surgical drainage is the best therapy. Also called adventitious cyst, false cyst. See also pancreatitis.

pseudocyst

Parasitology A cyst-like 'mass' that corresponds to a macrophage laden with Toxoplasma gondii or other sporozoans which is most often seen in the brain, a finding typical of AIDS neuropathy Pathology A dilated space lined by neither epithelium nor mesothelium, classically seen in the pancreas as unilocular spaces lined by fibrous tissue, often following multiple bouts of acute pancreatitis, or in the ultrarare hereditary pancreatitis.

pseu·do·cyst

(sū'dō-sist)
1. An accumulation of fluid in a cystlike loculus, but without an epithelial or other membranous lining.
Synonym(s): adventitious cyst.
2. A cyst with a wall formed by a host cell and not by a parasite.
3. A mass of 50 or more Toxoplasma bradyzoites, found within a host cell, frequently in the brain; a true cyst enclosed in its own membrane within the host cell that may rupture to release particles that form new cysts.
[pseudo- + G. kystis, bladder]

pseudocyst

an abnormal dilated space resembling a cyst but not lined with epithelium, e.g. a retroperitoneal accumulation of urine from a leaking ureter.

pancreatic pseudocyst
accumulation of pancreatic secretions and cellular debris may occur with recurring episodes of pancreatitis, most commonly in dogs.
perirenal pseudocyst, perinephritic pseudocyst
see feline perirenal cysts.
salivary pseudocyst
see salivary mucocele.
References in periodicals archive ?
For the patient with HP who has a pancreatic disease such as pancreatic pseudocyst, surgical treatment may be appropriate.
Only symptomatic pseudocysts should be treated--in suitable cases, endoscopic treatment is the preferred treatment.
The diagnosis of a pancreatic pseudocyst is more dependent upon the clinical history and the associated findings of chronic pancreatitis.
Diagnostic imaging studies including brain computed tomography, shunt series, and in the last 36 months of study, ultrasound of the abdomen to rule out pseudocyst.
Congestive heart failure Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Cerebrovascular disease, unspecified Cardiomegaly Bladder cancer without surgery Rheumatic heart disease without surgery Hyperthyroidism Urinary tract infection Contusion of lower limb Gastric ulcer without perforation, bleeding, or surgery Essential hypertension Lower limb ulcer without surgery Alcohol dependence Vertebral fracture or injury, unspecified Ischemic heart disease, unspecified Heart disease, unspecified Pseudocyst of pancreas without surgery Noninfectious gastroenteritis Unspecified neurotic disorder Intra-abdominal malignancy without surgery Malignancy of skin with operation on nose Disseminated malignancy, site unspecified, without surgery Angina pectoris Second admission for fracture of pelvis, no surgery
Nasal polyposis is a chronic inflammatory disorder characterized by intense eosinophilia and tissue remodeling that involves epithelial proliferation, goblet cell hyperplasia, pseudocyst formation, basement membrane thickening, focal fibrosis, and edema.
In chronic pancreatitis, several factors may increase the risk of acute bleeding, such as duration of disease, proximity of a vessel to a pseudocyst, communication with the biliary or pancreatic ducts, and splenic vein occlusion due to thrombosis.
The surgical specimen was consistent with a fibrouswall-lined pseudocyst containing hemorrhagic fluid.
He recovered after assisted ventilation and drainage of a pseudocyst.
The remaining 4 patients with documented portals of entry had pleural empyema, an infected pseudocyst, an infected knee prosthesis, and an infected AV fistula as the sources for their bacteremias.
This unusual but benign mass, which has a distinct sonographic appearance, has also been referred to as benign encysted fluid, inflammatory cyst of the peritoneum, peritoneal pseudocyst, entrapped ovarian cyst, multilocular peritoneal cyst, and postoperative peritoneal cyst (1).
shock, renal failure, respiratory insufficiency, disseminated intravascular coagulation, pancreatic necrosis, an abscess, a pseudocyst, or intestinal perforation or bleeding).