pseudoclaudication

pseudoclaudication

[-klô′dikā′shən]
painful cramps that are not caused by peripheral artery disease but rather by spinal, neurological, or orthopedic disorders, such as spinal stenosis, diabetic neuropathy, or arthritis.

pseudoclaudication

(sood?o-klod?i-ka'shon) [ pseudo- + claudication]
Pain in the lower extremities that develops when patients are standing for a long time. The pain is relieved by leaning forward or by sitting. It is caused by lumbar spinal stenosis and not by impaired blood flow through the aorta, iliac, or femoral arteries. See: intermittent claudication

pseudoclaudication

unilateral limb discomfort caused by spinal nerve root/s irritation; characterized by pain, numbness or weakness (radiating distally from buttock to thigh/lower leg) exacerbated by walking or standing, associated sensory and motor dysfunction, reduction/loss of limb tendon reflexes, but no vascular abnormality; symptoms are induced by elevation of affected limb, i.e. by hip flexion with knee in full extension (Table 1 and Table 2)
Table 1: Characteristics of spinal nerve root damage affecting the leg
Nerve rootSensory deficitMotor deficitTendon reflex response
Fourth lumbar (L4)Medial aspects of the lower leg, malleolus, footQuadriceps femoris (loss of active knee extension)Reduced knee jerk
Normal ankle jerk
Fifth lumbar (L5)Anterolateral aspect of the lower leg and dorsum of footExtensor hallucis longus (loss of active 1 MTPJ dorsiflexion)Normal knee jerk
Normal ankle jerk
First sacral (S1)Posterolateral aspect of lower legTriceps surae and plantar foot (loss of active ankle plantarflexion and knee flexion)Normal knee jerk
Reduced ankle jerk

1 MTPJ, first metatarsophalangeal joint.

Table 2: Percussion responses
Tendon stretch excited by percussionSpinal nerve roots stimulatedReflex response elicited
Biceps brachialisC5-C6Flexion of forearm at elbow
Triceps brachialisC7-C8Extension of forearm at elbow
PatellarL3-L4Knee joint extension
AchillesS1-S2Ankle joint plantarflexion
References in periodicals archive ?
The most common and specific symptom of LSS is neurogenic claudication, or pseudoclaudication (10).
The neurogenic or pseudoclaudication symptoms characteristic of lumbar spinal stenosis can be distinguished from peripheral vascular disease by their day-to-day variability, Dr.
Table 1 Important causes of back pain Cause Risk factor/clinical features Fracture History of trauma Tumor Age > 50 or <20 yr, history of cancer, pain worse in supine position or at night, constitutional symptoms Infections Immunosuppression, recent bacterial infection, IV drug abuse, constitutional symptoms Cauda equina syndrome Acure urinary retention, saddle anesthesia, lower-extremity weakness, reduction in anal sphincter tone Spinal stenosis Pseudoclaudication with pain that increases with walking and standing and is relieved by sitting or leaning forward Radiculopathy Sensory loss, weakness, and radiating radicular pain