pseudoaneurysm


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pseudoaneurysm

 [soo″do-an´u-rizm]
a condition resembling an aneurysm, but due to dilation or tortuosity of a vessel. Called also false or spurious aneurysm.

pseu·do·an·eu·rysm

(sū'dō-an'yū-rizm),
1. Pulsating, encapsulated hematoma in communication with the lumen of a ruptured vessel.
2. Ventricular pseudoaneurysm, a cardiac rupture contained and loculated by pericardium, which forms its external wall.
3. An aneurysm the walls of which consist of adventitia and periarterial fibrous tissue and hematoma.

pseudoaneurysm

/pseu·do·an·eu·rysm/ (-an´ūr-izm) false aneurysm; dilatation or tortuosity of a vessel, giving the appearance of an aneurysm.

pseudoaneurysm

[-an′yəriz′əm]
1 a dilation of an artery caused by damage to one or more layers of the artery as a result of arterial trauma or rupture of a true aneurysm.
2 a tortuosity of a blood vessel or cavity resulting from a herniated infarction. Also called pulsatile hematoma.

pseudoaneurysm

The preferred term for a false aneurysm in which the saccular dilation (“aneurysm”) does not involve all of the vessel wall layers.

Pseudoaneurysm should not be confused with phantom aneurysm (also known as aortismus abdominalis), a near-extinct term for the clinical misinterpretation of the (normal) aortic pulse as a sign of an abdominal aortic aneurysm, an error usually borne of inexperience.

pseudoaneurysm

False aneurysm, see there.

false an·eu·rysm

(fawls an'yŭr-izm)
1. Pulsating, encapsulated hematoma in communication with the lumen of a ruptured vessel;
2. Ventricular pseudoaneurysm, a cardiac rupture contained and loculated by pericardium, which forms its external wall.
3. An aneurysm with walls that consist of adventitia, periarterial fibrous tissue, and hematoma.

pseudoaneurysm

false aneurysm; differs from a true aneurysm in that its wall does not contain the components of an artery, but consists of fibrous tissue, which usually continues to enlarge, creating a pulsating hematoma.
References in periodicals archive ?
CT angiogram was performed prior to discharge and confirmed exclusion of the pseudoaneurysm with sac shrinkage and patency of the CHA-to-SMA bypass (Figure 4).
The first step is careful sonographic assessment of the pseudoaneurysm and the adjacent common femoral artery.
In contrast, a pseudoaneurysm may only be elastin stain positive at the site of its neck, point of traumatic disruption of the arterial wall (Fig.
Clinicians must maintain a high index of suspicion for a carotid pseudoaneurysm forming in a rapidly enlarging neck mass in individuals with the abovementioned risks.
Inadvertent arterial injection, particularly when attempting to inject into the femoral vein, that is, "groin injecting," may cause arterial pseudoaneurysm (4,5).
Intervenfional therapies are not without risks and include vessel wall injury or rupture with subsequent hemorrhage, vessel dissection, femoral artery pseudoaneurysm, hematoma, thrombus advancement, or ischemic stroke extension (Baker et al.
The incidence of femoral artery pseudoaneurysm (FAP), "one of the most troublesome" complications of cardiovascular procedures, has risen markedly with the exponential growth of interventional cardiology and the more frequent use of high-dose antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapies.
During the follow-up, no adverse events were observed - no hematoma, pseudoaneurysm or fistulas were present in any of the patients.
19) Predefined surgical complications included death, surgical re-exploration, conversion to open, bleeding necessitating transfusion, urine leak, dialysis, lymphocele, pyelonephritis, perinephric abscess, retroperitoneal hematoma, wound infection, urinary tract infection, pneumothorax, pseudoaneurysm, and bowel perforation.
Rare but life-threatening complications include hematoma formation enough to compromise airway, hemorrhage with or without hemothorax, cerebrovascular accidents from thromboembolism, Horner's syndrome, pseudoaneurysm or arteriovenous fistula formation, arterial occlusion, and even death (2, 3, 7).
Findings potentially seen using either technique can include luminal narrowing due to the intramural hematoma or pseudoaneurysm.