prussic acid


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Related to prussic acid: strychnine

hy·dro·cy·an·ic ac·id (HCN),

(hī'drō-sī-an'ik as'id),
HCN; A colorless, toxic liquid, with the odor of bitter almonds, present in bitter almonds (amygdalin), the stones of peaches, plums, and other drupes, and laurel leaves; inhalation of 300 ppm causes death.

prussic acid

/prus·sic ac·id/ (prus´ik) hydrogen cyanide; see under hydrogen.

prussic acid

see cyanide.
References in periodicals archive ?
Suicide: Cyanide, in the form of pure liquid prussic acid (a historical name for hydrogen cyanide), was also a favoured suicide agent of the Third Reich.
The oil is extracted by steam distillation after the nuts have been compressed and macerated in warm water for 24 hours, and it is during this process, that the prussic acid (Hydrocyanic acid) is formed.
While the bitter almond is shaped like its sweet equivalent, it generates potentially lethal hydrogen cyanide, prussic acid, when the raw flesh is damaged.
Bear in mind that their fruit contains prussic acid (cyanide) so they should not be planted where children -- or adults
The leaves contain hydrocyanic or prussic acid, a toxic substance.
His explanation that prussic acid gas was used to fumigate the bodies of people who had died from typhoid epidemics --and not to kill people--was derisively rejected as preposterous.
Melmotte drank prussic acid to avoid facing public ruin, which I guess was the Victorian equivalent of a tumble from a private yacht.