provocative diagnosis

provocative diagnosis

[-vok′ətiv]
Etymology: L, provocare, to call forth; Gk, dia, through, gnosis, knowledge
a diagnosis in which the identity and cause of an illness are discovered by inducing an episode of the condition. For example, in immunology an allergen causing an allergic response is shown to be a causative factor in the patient's allergic condition.
References in periodicals archive ?
In his introduction, Smith tells us that he plans to examine the wide range of fields to which Taylor has contributed (such as, the limits of mechanistic social science; the role of interpretation and cross-cultural judgment in social science; "the contemporary relevance of German Romantic philosophy"; "the connection between the self and broadly speaking 'moral' concerns"; contemporary political discussions between liberals and communitarians; and his "original and provocative diagnosis of the maladies of the modern age") as strands of a unified project that turn on Maurice Merleau-Ponty's idea, "[B]ecause we are in the world, we are 'condemned to meaning'" (p.