protrude

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pro·trude

(prō-trūd'),
To thrust forward or project.

protrude

[L. protrudere]
To project; to extend beyond a border or limit.
References in periodicals archive ?
A six and half months old male miniature Beagle dog was presented with history of protrusion of gland of third eyelid of left eye since last one and half months (Fig.
It turned out that this water channel increased the movement capacity of the white blood cells, and also accumulated in the cell membrane where it promoted the formation of protrusions.
For observation of the characteristics of heat transfer in case of forced convection, we used a channel, in which the lower plate had triangular protrusions (Fig.
This could cause other muscles to compensate and cause the protrusions.
We report on maximum flow speeds found in association with areas in the wake of protrusions (henceforth referred to as protrusions), crevices perpendicular to flow (henceforth referred to as crevices), and unobstructed planar areas (henceforth referred to as horizontal microhabitats).
Alert officers, however, may notice a slight bulge or protrusion that raises their suspicions.
And then there is the wonderfully discordant Because We Care, a pink-on-pink valentine replete with all manner of cavities and protrusions dangling and interpenetrating across its frenetic field.
The IACP's "behavioral profile" recommends that officers look for "multiple anomalies" in individual behavior, including (as paraphrased by the Post) "wearing a heavy coat or jacket in warm weather or carrying a briefcase, duffel bag or backpack with protrusions or visible wires.
The research consisted of analyzing the effects of fetal bovine serum on the average cell diameter, protrusion count, and length of protrusions of central nervous system neurons harvested from the frontal brain lobes of chicken embryos ranging from seven to nine days of development.
There can be problems with both cavities and protrusions.
Furthermore, accompanying each one of these protrusions is an intrusion, or hole, in the material's bulk.