protrude

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pro·trude

(prō-trūd'),
To thrust forward or project.

protrude

[L. protrudere]
To project; to extend beyond a border or limit.
References in periodicals archive ?
Due to this reason, it is necessary to interfere in the boundary layer by various protrusions (Cemecky & Koniar, 2010).
He said the protrusion was down to her "very thinned out skin - tented and pulled over the edge of the angle of her jaw".
2,5,6) In the event of rapid protrusion and fixation of the eyeball, the surgeon must be prepared to perform emergency orbital decompression to prevent blindness.
BENEFITS--Improved mold quality and increased density with higher strength protrusions Molds are fully supported during pattern draw and handling, especially important for molds incorporating large green sand cores.
Sensors with protrusions, such as Toroidal (electrodeless) conductivity sensors, cause disruption of stock flow around the measurement area, making for a noisy measurement.
Intercellular spread of Shigella flexneri through a monolayer mediated by membranous protrusions and associated with reorganization of the cytoskeletal protein vinculin.
Those rules require flat shoes or protrusions of no more than about 1/16th of an inch for horses racing on the grass.
With immersion lithography causing a dramatic rise in systematic defects, customers require the 2800's extremely sensitive and highly flexible inspection technology, which is capable of detecting the broadest range of defect types, including the novel defect types created by immersion litho technology, such as bubbles, watermarks, bridging and protrusions.
The cancer cell does so by forming short-lived invadopodia--foot-like protrusions these cells use to invade.
The current thinking is that, in this way, the membrane can push out and create the protrusions.
Tubing is supplied in an expanded state, allowing easy slippage over instruments, fittings and other protrusions.
For instance, bony protrusions that shore up her lower jaw appear in a modern human skull that is from Eastern Europe more than 100,000 years old, Trinkaus says.