YWHAQ

(redirected from protein tau)

YWHAQ

A gene on chromosome 2p25.1 that encodes an adapter protein which regulates a broad spectrum of general and specialised signalling pathways by binding to a large number of partners, usually by recognising a phosphoserine or phosphothreonine motif. YWHAQ downregulates PDPK1’s kinase activity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Peripheral plasma levels of the CNS protein tau are chronically elevated after traumatic brain injury and appear to correlate with the severity of postconcussive symptoms, according to a report published in JAMA Neurology.
This project s goal is therefore to understand the role of LRRK2 phosphorylation in PD by pursuing 3 specific aims: 1) elucidate the regulation of LRRK2 phosphorylation by phosphatases, 2) determine LRRK2 phosphorylation downstream phenotypes in cellular models through transcriptome profiling, protein translation profiling and protein tau related phenotypes, and 3) verify these findings from experimental models in PD biosamples.
Tangles were found to be composed of abnormal filaments largely made up of a short fragment of the protein Tau in 1988 by Professor Claude Wischik (co-founder of TauRx Therapeutics Ltd) and colleagues in Cambridge, UK.
After treatment with EAS, the changes of [alpha]-synuclein, caspase-3, parkin, phospho-protein kinase B (Akt), phospho-glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3(3), and phospho-microtubule-associated protein tau (Tau) in WT-[alpha]-Syn or A53T-[alpha]-Syn transgenic cells were reverted back to near normal levels, demonstrated by the western blotting and quantitative real-time PCR outcomes.
Much of this effort has been focused on the plaque-forming amyloid [beta] peptides (2) and the microtubule binding protein tau (3) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF).
The protein tau is involved in a number of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease.
This means that when FKBP52 is low, the level of protein tau becomes elevated in the brain, resulting in Alzheimer's.
Ceri's research involves studying fruit flies which have been genetically engineered and specially bred to have the human protein Tau in their eye.
Made up of the protein tau, they form inside nerve cells in the brain, and first destroy nerve cells linked to memory, then destroy neurons in other parts of the brain.
The disease damages the brain through the protein tau, which forms tangles in the brain's nerves cells.
Scientists noted the extent of different kinds of amyloid plaques, which occur when snipped fragments of a larger protein clump together, and neurofibrillary tangles, which form when threads of the protein tau become entangled, damaging critical neurons, or nerve cells, in the brain.
The cytoplasmic protein Tau has recently gained much interest as a target for new therapies of Alzheimers disease where it is abnormally phosphorylated resulting in the generation of neurofibrillary tangles (aggregates) toxic to neurons.