capsid

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capsid

 [kap´sid]
the shell of protein that protects the nucleic acid of a virus; it is composed of structural units, or capsomers. According to the number of subunits possessed by capsomers, they are called dimers (2), trimers (3), pentamers (5), or hexamers (6).

cap·sid

(kap'sid),
Protein coat of a virus. See: virion.

capsid

/cap·sid/ (kap´sid) the shell of protein that protects the nucleic acid of a virus; it is composed of structural units, or capsomers.

capsid

(kăp′sĭd)
n.
The protein coat that constitutes the shell of a virus particle.

capsid

[kap′sid]
Etymology: L, capsa, box
the layer of protein enveloping the genome of a virion. A capsid is composed of structural units called capsomeres. Its symmetry may be cubic or helical.

capsid

A protein coat that covers the nucleoprotein core or nucleic acid (RNA, DNA) of a free virus particle or phage, which may have icosahedral symmetry and itself be enclosed in an envelope—e.g., Togaviridae. It is composed of an integer multiple of 60 subunits, which self-assemble in a pattern typical for a particular virus.

vi·ri·on

(vī'rē-on)
The complete virus particle that is structurally intact and infectious.

capsid

The protein coat that encloses the genome of a virus.

capsid

the protein coat of a virus.

Capsid

The outer protein coat of a virus.
Mentioned in: Noroviruses

capsid

outer coat of a virus

capsid

the shell of protein that protects the nucleic acid of a virus; it is composed of individual morphological units called capsomers. For icosahedral viruses, there are two kinds of capsomers called pentamers, which occupy the 12 corner positions of the icosahedral shell, and hexamers, which occupy the face and edges. The number of hexamers varies between different viruses. The capsomers of helical viruses are composed of a single polypeptide and are also called protomers. All viruses of animals, except for poxviruses which have a complex structure, are minimally composed of a nucleocapsid which is the capsid surrounding the nucleic acid. In addition some viruses have an envelope surrounding the nucleocapsid.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dr Howorka added, "Now that we have worked out how to obtain the structure of the S-layer in one bacterium, we expect that the structure of the protein coats of other species will soon be revealed.
Duncan Wardrop, associate professor of chemistry at University of Illinois at Chicago and corresponding author of the new study, collaborated with UIC virologist Lijun Rong, who created a screening system that uses a chimeric HIV-Ebola virus bearing the protein coat of the Ebola virus.
They collect so-called thermophile microorganisms from the hot springs at Yellowstone National Park and also chemically modify the protein coats of conventional viruses to withstand variations in temperature and acidity.
In addition, Oncolys through this agreement secured the Asian rights for OBP-701 (TT-033), a novel therapeutic product containing three separate RNAi elements entrapped in an AAV protein coat, for the Asian territory, targeting HCV.
Arntzen's institute has pioneered the vaccine-bearing banana, implanting in it the genes that code for elements of the hepatitis B virus' protein coat.
The image reveals the structure of a type of protein coat shared by hundreds of known viruses containing double-stranded RNA genomes.
Deuterium forms stronger bonds than hydrogen, says lead researcher Radu Crainic, and thus holds the viral genetic material and surrounding protein coat together more tightly.
The phage particles most useful for antibody phage display contain a single-stranded DNA molecule enclosed in a protein coat.
An enveloped virus contains a fatty, lipid membrane surrounding its protein coat.
HIV -- even pieces of the virus' protein coat - can activate microgila without necessarily infecting these cells, Merrill says.
An hour after the second infusion, the adult animals were given intravenous doses of a virus called SHIV-vpu+, which combines the core of SIV, the virus that causes AIDS in primates, with the protein coat of HIV, which causes the disease in humans.