mentorship

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mentorship

 [men´tor-ship] (pl. men·tor·ship)
a type of preparation for the professional role, in which a mentor works closely with another person to teach, guide, and support; it differs from preceptorship in being more intense and of longer duration.

mentorship

The state of being a mentor.
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The mentor protege committee will make every effort to match proteges with one of their mentor choices.
Real proteges are those who possess special talent--unique and valued skills that if honed properly might actually improve the quality of the profession or the art.
In other words, the mentor does not tell the protege what to do, but Mstead shares his or her experience and provides guidance in order to help the protege make better decisions and serves as a sounding board for the protege's ideas and plans.
With an intense two-year curriculum, the new Protege Program supports high-potential women entrepreneurs who are dedicated to growing their businesses and building their leadership skills.
Some bosses' contributions began before their protege started the international assignment.
We have actually established and developed this product to match the demands of contemporary men and women-- to combat the indicators of aging and get rid of the attributes that accompany it," states Tam Ma of Protege Beauty.
The unique Protege profile fits your hand nicely making the monitor comfortable to hold.
26,27) Therefore, the ideal mentor constantly reflects upon his or her own mentoring voyage, diving deep into past experiences in order to harvest any pearls of wisdom that might benefit the protege.
Nonetheless, little is known about whether or how individual social skill influences the workplace mentoring process, although it seems likely that both mentor and protege social skill influences the costs and benefits of a mentoring relationship.
Mentorship is also said to be beneficial for the mentor in that he is able to leave behind a legacy to a new generation of employees (Erikson, 1963), he is able to use his knowledge productively in order to assist the protege (Levinson, 1978), he receives gratification from peer recognition and gains loyal supporters (Vincent & Seymour, 1995, Eby & Lockwood, 2005), and that for female mentors, mentorship may facilitate career progress by breaking the glass ceiling (Parker & Kram, 1993).
Instead, it is an introduction to the new guide with just enough information to pique the interest of both the mentor and protege to begin a wonderful mentoring relationship.
One protege in the first cohort wrote 114 pages of reflection over the course of the year-long experience.