protective


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

protective

 [pro-tek´tiv]
1. affording protection.
2. an agent that provides defense against harmful influences; called also screen.

protective

/pro·tec·tive/ (-tek´tiv)
1. affording defense or immunity.
2. an agent affording defense or immunity.

protective

[-tek′tiv]
Etymology: L, protegere, to cover
guarding another person from danger or injury and providing a safe environment.

protective

1. providing protection.
2. substances used to provide protection to tissues.

protective clothing
varies with the risk prevailing, e.g. radiation (see x-ray protection), waterproof gear for highly infectious diseases, coveralls for normal large animal practice, metal studded gloves for catching aggressive companion animals.
protective isolation
a type of isolation designed to prevent contact between potentially pathogenic microorganisms and uninfected animals which have seriously impaired resistance. Called also reverse isolation. It is recommended for patients suffering from agranulocytosis, severe and extensive dermatitis, certain types of lymphomas and leukemias, and those who are receiving immunosuppressive therapy.
protective substances
finely ground, absorbent, insoluble, inert substances that absorb toxins, cover sensitive and damaged tissues with a fine film. Includes starch, kaolin, talc, zinc oxide, zinc stearate. See also intestinal protectant.

protectant, protective

1. affording defense or immunity.
2. an agent affording defense against harmful influence.

intestinal protectant
a preparation that given orally provides a protective coating for the intestinal mucosa, and absorbs bacteria and toxins. Kaolin, pectin and activated charcoal are commonly used for this purpose.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our analysts have observed that a one-size-fit-all solution approach is rarely applicable in the protective packaging industry in the North America region.
Vaccine-induced or natural upper respiratory tract infection in humans may not engender an optimally protective memory Tc-cell population because of insufficient number or composition.
There is a perception, particularly in the hot metal industries, that heavyweight cotton is suitable as protective clothing.
Is laundering protective apparel managed by the practice (rather than the responsibility of the employee)?
All the groups examined contained a substantial proportion of people with a single copy of one of the two protective mutations.
2) However, the formation of public perceptions created by the media's framing of police canine issues has contributed greatly to establishing protective vests in the public's mind as the solution to all death and injury scenarios for police service animals.
In 1851, the crioulo sodality was transformed into the Protective Society of the Needy (Sociedade Protetora dos Desvalidos) after having transferred its headquarters from the chapel in Quinze Misterios Church to the Church of Our Lady of the Rosary of Black People in the Pelourinho on December 17, 1848.
It can be shown that for a given wax of known composition used in this manner, the thickness, character and chemical composition of the protective film, or indeed the very appearance of such a film at the surface, depends to a very large extent on the temperature of that surface.
The scope of this research includes five major types of industrial protective clothing: high-visibility, heat and fire-resistant (FR), chemical, antistatic, and chainsaw clothing.
Currently SA-4668D is in progress for 688 class submarines, which replaces current 30-minute SCBA bottles with new 45-minute SCBA bottles with clear protective sleeves installed (APL 99A010026), replaces current locker bottle brackets and repairs broken lockers.
Protective claims are commonly filed when a taxpayer's right to a refund is contingent on future events (such as pending litigation or an expected statutory or regulatory change) that will not be resolved until after the statute of limitations (SOL) expires.