prostitution

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The performance of sexual activity for hire

prostitution

STD Performance of sexual work–ie, sexual activity for hire Epidemiology There are 0.5–2 million prostitutes–US; enter the field ± age 14; arrests for prostitution/commercialized vice, 1992 ♀ 47,526; ♂ 24,401; 17% of ♂ have solicited prostitutes. See Child prostitution, Sexual work, Sexually transmitted diseases.

prostitution

(pros″tĭ-too′shŏn, -tū′) [L. prostitutio, prostitution]
The exchange of sexual favors for money. It is a risk factor for the spread of sexually transmitted diseases, including chlamydia, gonorrhea, trichomoniasis, syphilis, hepatitis, and AIDS.

prostitution

Sale of sex, most commonly by women. This may be a part-time or full-time private enterprise or one organized on a small or large scale by pimp, brothel-keepers or call-girl ring organizers. In general, the lot of the prostitute is not a happy one and most of the girls involved are driven by economic necessity into an unpleasant and often dangerous trade. Many of them, through inadequacy of one kind or another, are unable to sustain more conventional employment. The legal status of prostitution varies considerably from country to country and even within a country. Prostitution is legal, for instance, in Nevada, but illegal in other American states. Most male prostitutes offer services to other men, but a few (gigolos) cater for women.
References in periodicals archive ?
A future legal provision regarding prostitution should make a clear distinction between the prostitution activities and other activities that may have an artistic, educational, cultural, medical, erotically, sexual, pornographic or entertaining purpose but also may have some common features with prostitution (e.
We appreciate that a good definition of this social phenomenon would be the following: prostitution consists in a person's action of committing sexual activities with one of more persons, for the purpose of obtaining material advantages, outside and artistic, educational, medical or scientifical environment.
Maintaining a moderate penal sanctionatory provision for committing unauthorized prostitution and panderism that doesn't involve constraining or deceiving of the prostitute, but his or her free will;
Enforcing an administrative sanctionatory system for the infringement of legal activities of prostitution.
In all families, daughters involved in prostitution remitted large amounts of money to their parents.
In an economy that offers girls no viable alternatives for earning enough money to meet family obligations, prostitution is viewed as an acceptable, if still socially frowned-upon, choice, Rende Taylor asserts.
Prostitution performed out of the need to aid one's family builds up merit, despite the nature of the job itself.
Psychologist Christine Liddell of the University of Ulster in Londonderry, Northern Ireland, says that the parents studied by Rende Taylor often selected middle-born girls for prostitution to limit any damage to household functioning should the risky venture fail to yield much revenue or result in harm to a child.