prosody


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pros·o·dy

(proz'ŏ-dē),
The varying rhythm, intensity, and frequency of speech that are interpreted as stress or intonation that aid meaning transmission.

pros·o·dy

(proz'ŏ-dē)
The varying rhythm, stress, and frequency of speech that aids meaning transmission.

prosody

(prŏs′ă-dē) [L. prosodia, accent of a syllable]
The normal rhythm, melody, and articulation of speech.
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References in periodicals archive ?
On the other hand, if we insist on the materiality that traditional prosody celebrates, and on rhythm demanding some patterning on that level, we cannot find it in much of free verse.
Then authors have design the measurement of Klonn-Pad prosody checking by refer to Klonn-Pad structure and rules.
When examining the relationship between reading skill and reading prosody, researchers find that dysfluent readers read passages slowly without proper expression (Cowie, Douglas-Cowie, & Wichmann, 2002).
In simultaneous interpreting, does a source text in English that features non-native prosody affect rendition accuracy of a target text in Chinese?
Importantly, it may also function as a rehearsal mechanism for retrieving the underpinning prosody.
The book's fourth and final chapter chronicles the incremental rise to dominance of free verse and concomitant decline of musical prosody.
In addition it is investigated in precisely which temporal parameters of word prosody the possible rate specifics of emotional speech is manifested.
In his book, Stalling uses this notion of "sinophonic English"; that is, English written in Chinese characters and thus spoken with a strong Chinese accent in sharp contrast with the contempt and ridicule that people have often held against so-called "Chinglish," as Stalling sincerely seeks out the beautiful prosody within the accent.
Yet, there has been a heated debate between conservatives (1) and liberals (2) over prosody in Kiswahili poetry composition.
In particular, we examine the role of two sources of information to which very young infants may plausibly have access: phrasal prosody and function words.
They find that science concepts cannot be abstracted from their complex performances, and that understanding these performances requires taking account of the body, how it is placed in and moves across space, its orientation, its movements, the aspects of the setting it marks, prosody, and other factors.
In addition, the authors remain faithful to the NICHD claim that fluency is made up of accuracy, automaticity, and appropriate prosody.