prosody

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Related to prosodic: Prosodic Features

pros·o·dy

(proz'ŏ-dē),
The varying rhythm, intensity, and frequency of speech that are interpreted as stress or intonation that aid meaning transmission.

pros·o·dy

(proz'ŏ-dē)
The varying rhythm, stress, and frequency of speech that aids meaning transmission.

prosody

(prŏs′ă-dē) [L. prosodia, accent of a syllable]
The normal rhythm, melody, and articulation of speech.
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References in periodicals archive ?
As defined by Will Crutchfield, "The Prosodic Appoggiatura in the Music of Mozart and his Contemporaries," Journal of the American Musicological Society 42, no.
Words in this list are categorized in light monosyllables (non-branched rhyme) and heavy monosyllables (branched rhyme, according to the several prosodic and morphological conditions explicated in the right-foremost columns of Figure 1); the reasons for this categorization will be made more clear later on.
A functional-pragmatic translation approach (House, 2001) or communicative translation method (Newmark, 1988)--subject to clarity of the recording, and availability of context and co-text--take into consideration the prosodic features in the listening process but without having them actually documented.
The studies that used vocal sounds and other stimuli have investigated brain hemodynamic responses to evaluate the perceptual processing during the exposure to audiovisual stimuli [18]; brain lateralization for speech sounds and non-vocal sounds (native and non-native speech, human onomatopoeia and monkey sounds) [10]; processing of vocal and prosodic specificity [19]; ability of the newborn to memorize words [6]; processing for linguistic and non-linguistic sounds in bilingual and monolingual children [20].
Charles Hartman's now classic Free Verse: An Essay on Prosody demonstrates the attractive possibility of perceiving lineation as a prosodic and rhythmic element in the working of free verse.
This procedure has many advantages over previously used prosodic analyses, since it increases the reliability and validity of results, speeds up the production of prosodic parameters and minimizes the influence of the coding skills of the subject, as it uses an emotionally neutral text.
In other words, a dialect speaker may borrow an Italian prosodic structure (3(a) and 4(a)), but the original dialect prosodic rules and constraints remain intact as an alternative, producing forms like 3(b), 4(b), and 4(c), and avoiding forms like 3(c).
Therefore we will refer to these segments as prosodic segments.
Criticism to date has had a very limited understanding of the widespread and divergent prosodic debates and theories of the past; the essays in Meter Matters provide highly promising paths through the rough terrain of poetic sound.
It clearly irked the erstwhile Cambridge Apostle that Coleridge--who, well before reproving Tennyson's irregular verse, had espoused organic form as that which avoided "mere regularity" (8)--had not caught Tennyson's prosodic drift.
Yet Martin shows that, as much as Bridges sought to democratise English verse form--freeing verse from the 'pedantry' of the scansion system by shedding English metre of its Greek and Latin yoke and instituting a prosodic pattern more aligned to the natural patterns of English speech--it was the concept of metrical regulation that would become as frustrating to Bridges as to his Modernist counterparts.
The study of the role of prosodic breaks and pitch accents in comprehension has usually focused on sentence processing, through the use of laboratory speech produced by both trained and untrained speakers.