proscription


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proscription

(pro-skrip'shon) [L. proscriptio, a written public notice, outlawry]
Restriction of behavior based on cultural or religious beliefs.
See: taboo
References in periodicals archive ?
Unfortunately, his well-intentioned policy proscriptions are entirely undermined by his poor causal inferences and failure to consider, present, or discuss the public-choice literature.
It also operates under other names, which all fall under the same proscription order: Al Muhajiroun, Islam4UK, Call to Submission, Islamic Path, London School of Sharia, Muslims Against Crusades, Need4Khilafah, the Shariah Project and the Islamic Dawah Association.
Although the death penalty clearly was not considered a ''cruel and unusual'' punishment when the Eighth Amendment proscription of such punishments was adopted, perhaps society's ''evolving standards of decency'' have brought this punishment under the proscription.
The Australian government has extended the proscription on the LTTE for another 3 years.
Jebril said political proscription should be based on what individuals had done rather than the jobs they had held.
He urged the German authorities to keep a close watch on their activities in breach of the EU proscription, the External Affairs Ministry said.
Amendment, for example, criticises abortion laws in the US and elsewhere, arguing for choice rather than proscription.
The sentence from the Tehran Revolutionary Court included a five-year proscription on any cultural, political or media activities after her six-month jail term.
The biggest proof for that is the continuation of the proscription affecting the minds in the Islamic world, in the hope that their concomitant absence will not stand as proof for the difficulty of getting rid of that proscription.
Mr Johnson said the ban was needed to tackle terrorism and warned the group had tried to escape proscription simply by changing its name.
We are clear that an organisation should not be able to circumvent proscription by simply changing its name.
Johnson said the organization was already banned under two other names -- Al Ghurabaa and The Saved Sect -- and militant groups should not be able to circumvent proscription simply by changing their names.