propulsive force


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propulsive force

force on a body or object used to accelerate it in a required direction (usually forward). See also thrust.
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the beginning of the propulsive phase defined as the instant previous to the abrupt propulsive force increase, to be matched (qualitatively) with the swimming stroke instant in the video.
The alleged mechanism of injury of the brachial plexus in intrauterine maladaptation is the propulsive force generated by spontaneous or provoked uterine contraction prior to or during labor.
A certain mechanism is at work, both in the propulsive force of the drone that sweeps up the individual's voice beyond its own concerns and in the discourse-breaking mechanisms of collage and assembling.
Worn like a "suit" by people with paralysis, the system provides the structural support to stand, and the propulsive force to stand, walk, ascend/descend stairs, and engage in other "vertical" activities, all while being controlled by the user.
At the same time, however, longer toes allow more propulsive force, permitting greater acceleration in sprinting.
The novel is a fast and easy read; the simple storytelling never loses its propulsive force.
In their world rhythm is king, and Stanier is the kind of time-keeper you could set your watch to, all propulsive force and accuracy on tracks like latest single Atlas.
The ubiquity of the revolutionary dream in Italy gave Red Brigadism its propulsive force.
The craft will also provide Mir with propulsive force when it makes its return passage to Earth.
Instead, he considers Jewish renewal as the propulsive force for an energetic, politically progressive movement.
Swing your hip forward as you step forward--it's the hips and legs that act as the propulsive force.
They have such a propulsive force behind the movie and yet it's still so intricate and detailed.