proprioceptor


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Related to proprioceptor: kinesthesia

proprioceptor

 [pro″pre-o-sep´tor]
any of the sensory nerve endings that give information concerning movements and position of the body; they occur chiefly in muscles, tendons, and the labyrinth. adj., adj propriocep´tive.

pro·pri·o·cep·tor

(prō'prē-ō-sep'tŏr),
One of a variety of sensory end organs (such as the muscle spindle and Golgi tendon organ) in muscles, tendons, and joint capsules that sense position or state of contraction.

proprioceptor

/pro·prio·cep·tor/ (-sep´ter) any of the sensory nerve endings that give information concerning movements and position of the body; they occur chiefly in muscles, tendons, and joint capsules; receptors in the labyrinth may be included.propriocep´tive

proprioceptor

(prō′prē-ō-sĕp′tər)
n.
A sensory receptor, found chiefly in muscles, tendons, joints, and the inner ear, that detects the motion or position of the body or a limb by responding to stimuli arising within the organism.

pro′pri·o·cep′tive adj.

proprioceptor

[prō′prē·əsep′tər]
Etymology: L, proprius + capere
any sensory nerve ending, such as those located in muscles, tendons, joints, and the vestibular apparatus, that responds to stimuli originating from within the body related to movement and spatial position. Also called proprioceptive receptor. Compare exteroceptor, interoceptor. See also mechanoreceptor.
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Proprioceptor

proprioceptor

A sensory end organ that provides information about the position of the body and its parts in space at a particular moment in time; proprioceptors are present in muscle, tendons and joint capsules, and include the muscle spindle and the Golgi tendon organ.

pro·pri·o·cep·tor

(prō'prē-ō-sep'tŏr)
One of a variety of sensory end organs (such as the muscle spindle and Golgi tendon organ) in muscles, tendons, and joint capsules.

proprioceptor

a receptor structure, linked to the nervous system of animals, that detects internal changes, particularly around joints, in tendons and muscles.

proprioceptor,

n sensory organs located in joint capsules, muscles, and tendons that receive information on posture, body position, and motion and send this information to the central nervous system.

proprioceptor

any of the sensory nerve endings that give information concerning movements and position of the body; they occur chiefly in muscles, tendons and the labyrinth.
References in periodicals archive ?
Additionally, it is known that the cervical spine proprioceptors have a direct influence on oculomotor control and, when dysfunctional, can create visual disturbances (Carlsson and Rosenhall 1990, Gimse et al 1996).
Unstable surface was assumed to create a proprioceptively enriched environment that progressively challenges the proprioceptors and nervous system (42).
Is there a history of head and neck trauma, neck spasm, joint surgery or replacement, arthritis, diabetes, or peripheral vascular disease affecting the proprioceptors and mechanoceptors?
Proprioceptors in muscles and joints sense and continually adjust the length and tension of muscles and the angles of joints.
ROM movement causes proprioceptors (sensors at the nerve endings in muscles, tendons, and joints) to "wake up" and "reset" themselves.
The athletes in these sports perform based primarily on their own sense of internal receptors or proprioceptors (body information).
The different types of input are sensed by a variety of mechanoreceptors, proprioceptors, nociceptors, and thermoreceptors that are responsive to changes in muscle length and rate of change in length, muscle tension, joint position, vibration, deep pressure stimulation, skin pressure, pain, temperature, and touch (Shelton, 1989).
In other words, very few corrections from the muscle's proprioceptors are required as a result of the information this feedback provides once the skill is set into motion.
Proprioceptors in muscles, joints, and even our vestibular system to some extent all contribute information to our auditory structures.
The joints in your body have balance detectors, or proprioceptors, that allow the body to realize what position it is in space.
In fact, we really are not aware of our core temperature at all, but when skin temperature rises, we feel hot due to heat proprioceptors in the skin.
When a muscle in a stretched position is held and then contracted, proprioceptors (sensory end organs in muscles, tendons, and joints) called golgi tendon organs (GTOs) are stimulated.