proprioceptive

(redirected from proprioceptive deficit)
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pro·pri·o·cep·tive

(prō'prē-ō-sep'tiv),
Capable of receiving stimuli originating in muscles, tendons, and other internal tissues.
[L. proprius, one's own, + capio, to take]

proprioceptive

[prō′prē·əsep′tiv]
Etymology: L, proprius, one's own, capere, to take
pertaining to the sensations of body movements and awareness of posture, enabling the body to orient itself in space without visual clues.

pro·pri·o·cep·tive

(prō'prē-ō-sep'tiv)
Capable of receiving stimuli originating in muscles, tendons, and other internal tissues.
[L. proprius, one's own, + capio, to take]

Proprioceptive

Pertaining to proprioception, or the awareness of posture, movement, and changes in equilibrium and the knowledge of position, weight, and resistance of objects as they relate to the body.

pro·pri·o·cep·tive

(prō'prē-ō-sep'tiv)
Capable of receiving stimuli originating in muscles, tendons, and other internal tissues.
[L. proprius, one's own, + capio, to take]

proprioceptive (prō´preōsep´tiv),

adj describes the body's ability to sense the movement and position of muscles without visual guides. It is essential for any activity requiring hand-eye coordination.

proprioceptive

pertaining to or emanating from proprioceptor.

proprioceptive deficit
a defect of proprioception in which the animal acts as though it does not know where its feet are (in contrast to a cerebellar defect when the feet do not end up where the animal appears to intend that they should go).
proprioceptive positioning
positioning of the limbs or head and neck in response to proprioceptive inputs. The basis of postural reflexes.
proprioceptive reflex
a reflex that is initiated by stimuli arising from some function of the reflex mechanism itself.
References in periodicals archive ?
The findings of Marshall (1993) supported this theory and suggested that damage to the ankle joint capsule, which could occur with an anterior talofibular ligament sprain, might cause a proprioceptive deficit as well as an impairment of joint protective reflexes.
Konradsen and Ravn 1991, Konradsen et al 1993, Nawoczenski et al 1985) have hypothesised that a partial deafferentation has occurred in those with ankle inversion injuries, resulting in a proprioceptive deficit.
Since 1965, the modified Romberg test used by Freeman et al to examine static balance has frequently been used in ankle sprain studies with a view to quantifying any accompanying proprioceptive deficit.
1) In position sense studies, results have ranged from the finding of no proprioceptive deficit, to a greater deficit in the unaffected ankle, to a definite deficit in position sense of the affected ankle;
However, due to the complex interactions of all these potential mediating neural mechanisms, and the limitations of testing neuromotor function in only a few isolated positions of the ankle (see Table 1-4), the approach used in several studies to establish the presence and nature of any injury-related proprioceptive deficit at the functionally unstable ankle joint might have been inadequate, both for demonstrating the presence of a deficit or for discriminating the magnitude of the deficit.
Also, it cannot be excluded that in some cases, it is not simply mechanical instability which is driving the recurrent instability and that those proprioceptive deficits that are observed are simply a consequence of joint effusion, muscle inhibition, aging processes, fatigue or injury related inactivity (Konradsen and Magnusson, 2000), rather than any direct proprioceptive deficit.
Further, performance assessments conducted using the taxonomy of tasks as outlined by Gentile (1987) might help to more clearly identify the extent of any functionally related proprioceptive deficit of the unstable ankle.
As well, whether proprioceptive deficits in the periphery actually cause functional instability of the ankle joint, as recently implied by Richie (2001), is unclear, as concomitant findings of permanent damage to capsular, ligamentous and musculotendinous receptors have not been demonstrated in ankle sprain populations (Robbins and Waked 1998).
To improve the validity of the modified Romberg test for assessing proprioceptive deficits in ankle sprain populations, an alternative method using a uniaxial balance evaluator (UBE) requires subjects to stand on one foot on a single axis wobble board.
In this sense, although proprioceptive deficits have been implicated in the mechanisms of functional instability (Caulfield 2000), deficits in ankle proprioception have not always been observed in all individuals with symptoms of recurrent ankle inversion injuries (Tropp and Odenrick 1988).
Neurologic examination revealed severe hind limb proprioceptive deficits, paraparesis, decreased withdrawal reflex, and decreased-to-absent patellar reflexes, although response to deep pain was present.
The contribution of proprioceptive deficits, muscle function, and anatomic laxity to functional instability of the ankle.