proprietary name

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pro·pri·e·tar·y name

(prō-prī'ĕ-tār'ē nām),
The protected brand name or trademark, registered with the U.S. Patent Office, under which a manufacturer markets its product. It is written with a capital initial letter and is often further distinguished by a superscript R in a circle (®). Compare: generic name, nonproprietary name.
[L. proprietas, ownership]

proprietary name

n.
The patented brand name or trademark under which a manufacturer markets a product.

proprietary name

A commercial name granted by a naming authority for use in marketing a drug/device product in a particular jurisdiction.

pro·pri·e·tar·y name

(prŏ-prīĕ-tar-ē nām)
The protected brand name or trademark, registered with the U.S. Patent Office, under which a manufacturer markets a product. It is written with an initial capital letter, if appropriate, and is often further distinguished by a register mark (®).
Compare: generic name, nonproprietary name
[L. proprietas, ownership]

proprietary name

commercial drug name

pro·pri·e·tar·y name

(prŏ-prīĕ-tar-ē nām)
Protected brand name or trademark, registered with the U.S. Patent Office (or other governmental authority), under which a manufacturer markets its product. It is written with a capital initial letter and is often further distinguished by a superscript R in a circle (®).
[L. proprietas, ownership]
References in periodicals archive ?
1)SAS 70[c] is a proprietary term owned by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA).
SUN VALLEY, Idaho -- David Hepworth of Interfund Capital announced today the launch of their proprietary Term Asset Backed Securities Loan Facility (TALF) Fund.
1 )SAS 70((c)) is a proprietary term owned by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA).
Farmers have not been adversely affected by the proprietary terms involved in patent-protected GE seeds, the report says.
Supreme Court has ruled that, in some cases, rival firms may use the same proprietary terms even when that might cause confusion among customers.