proposition


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proposition

[prop′əzish′ən]
Etymology: L, proponere, to place forward
1 n, a statement of a truth to be demonstrated or an operation to be performed.
2 v, to bring forward or offer for consideration, acceptance, or adoption.

proposition

(prop-uh-zish'en)
A statement about a concept or about the relationship between concepts. A proposition may be an assumption, a premise, a theorem, or a hypothesis.
See: assumption; hypothesis; premise; theorem
References in periodicals archive ?
Proposition 98 offers Californians real protections against state and local abuses of eminent-domain powers.
The hospital's decision depends on the value proposition put forth by each company.
Proposition 11, on the shortage of priests clearly reaffirms "the importance of the inestimable gift of ecclesiastical celibacy in the practice of the Latin Church.
On March 7, 2000, two powerful trends in Golden State politics collided when California voters went to the polls to vote in the presidential primaries and to decide the fate of Proposition 22, the Limit on Marriage Initiative.
Because a proposition is conceived by Clark as something not to be beheld but experienced (she always resisted the theater, insisting that if her work was performative, it denied performance), any material record, except for the verbal account given by a participant, is disappointingly matter-of-fact.
An initiative that will appear on the November 1996 election ballot in California known as the Retirement Savings and Consumer Protection Act, or proposition 211, could have far-reaching effects on all U.
The revision in Outlook to Stable from Negative results from voter passage of Proposition G in November 2006, which eases revenue restrictions approved by voters two years earlier.
OVER 70 percent of California voters backed Proposition 83, ``Jessica's Law.
One way to deal with the changing business environment is to dust off the overused and cliched concept of the "value proposition.
As if being bashed by nature were not bad enough, at the polls this coming June, California faces a potentially catastrophic mudslide called Proposition 226.
The all-encompassing nature of one of the two propositions (Proposition 2) is cause for additional concern, and Fitch considers its possible implementation as a potential challenge to the city's credit quality given ongoing and future spending pressures.