Propionibacterium

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Propionibacterium

 [pro″pe-on″ĭ-bak-te´re-um]
a genus of gram-positive, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria, found as saprophytes in humans, animals, and dairy products. P. ac´nes (also known as Corynebacterium acnes) is a normal skin inhabitant and can cause chronic infections of the blood and bone marrow. P. granulo´sum (also known as Corynebacterium granulosum) causes abscesses.

Propionibacterium

(prō'pē-on'ē-bak-tē'rē-ŭm), Avoid the misspellings Propionobacterium and Proprionibacterium.
A genus of nonmotile, non-spore-forming, anaerobic to aerotolerant bacteria (family Propionibacteriaceae) containing gram-positive rods that are usually pleomorphic, diphtheroid, or club shaped, with one end rounded, the other tapered or pointed. Some cells may be coccoid, elongate, bifid, or even branched. The cells usually occur singly, in pairs, in V and Y configurations, short chains, or clumps in "Chinese character" arrangement. The metabolism of these organisms is fermentative, and the products of fermentation include combinations of propionic and acetic acids. These organisms occur in dairy products, on human skin, and in the intestinal tracts of humans and other animals. They may be pathogenic. The type species is Propionibacterium freudenreichii.

Propionibacterium

/Pro·pi·on·i·bac·te·ri·um/ (pro″pe-on″e-bak-tēr´e-um) a genus of gram-positive bacteria found as saprophytes in humans, animals, and dairy products.

Propionibacterium

[prō′pē·on′ēbaktir′ē·əm]
Etymology: Gk, pro + pion, fat, bakterion, small rod
a genus of nonmotile, anaerobic, gram-positive bacteria found on the skin of humans, in the intestinal tract of humans and animals, and in dairy products. Propionibacterium acnes is common in acne pustules. Formerly called Corynebacterium acnes.

Pro·pi·on·i·bac·te·ri·um

(prō'pē-on-i-bak-tēr'ē-ŭm)
A genus of nonmotile, non-spore-forming, anaerobic to aerotolerant bacteria containing gram-positive rods that are usually pleomorphic, diphtheroid, or club-shaped, with one end rounded, the other tapered or pointed. The cells usually occur singly, in pairs, in V and Y configurations, short chains, or clumps. These organisms occur in dairy products, on human skin, and in the intestinal tracts of humans and other animals. They may be pathogenic. The type species is P. freudenreichii.

Propionibacterium

gram-positive pleomorphic rods which are common skin residents, found also in dairy products and the alimentary tract.

Propionibacterium acnes
activates macrophages, increases proliferation of lymphoblasts, and stimulates resistance to bacterial infection. Used as a bacterial immunostimulant.
References in periodicals archive ?
found that streptococci we the most common genera in both normal and psoriasis skin, whereas staphylococci and Propionibacteria were significantly lower in psoriasis compared with control limb skin.
The authors said that previous studies have shown that propionibacteria are common commensal organisms, representing up to 30% of the bacteria on healthy skin.
Biosynthesis of folates by lactic acid bacteria and propionibacteria in fermented milk.
Enhancement of trehalose production in dairy propionibacteria through manipulation of environmental conditions.
Effects of propionibacteria and yeast culture fed to steers on nutrient intake and site and extent of digestion.
Effects of feeding propionibacteria to dairy cows on milk yield, milk components, and reproduction.
Antimicrobial peptides from propionibacteria may have potential as natural preservatives since these organisms are considered generally recognized as safe (GRAS) [8].
Propionibacteria produce about 47 gm propionic acid per liter of the growth medium [9].
Jenseniin P is a bacteriocin that has been shown to kill the various cutaneous propionibacteria responsible for acne vulgaris, a skin condition that infects the sebaceous glands and hair follicles of the face, neck, back and chest of millions of teenagers and adults each year.
The interactions between the propionibacteria and the lactic acid bacteria are particularly crucial for flavor, texture and appearance.
Prevalence of antibiotic-resistant propionibacteria on the skin of ache patients: 10-year surveillance data and snapshot distribution study.