prong


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prong

 [prong]
a conical projection.
nasal p's nasal cannula.

prong

(prahng)
A fine pointed projection.
[Med. L. pronga, fr. Germanic]

prong

(prŏng)
A cone-shaped body such as the root of a tooth.
References in periodicals archive ?
After much praise by publications like the New York Times, Washington Post, CNET, Gizmodo and Engadget, Prong continues to create innovative electronic accessories.
The prong slices were cut out in the middle of the length of the dried samples.
Use the notches on the left of the template to mark the first prong locations for Spots #4.
In light of the court's holding in the AmerGen case, taxpayers should consider the impact when asswned liabilities in an asset purchase satisfy the economic performance prong of Sec.
From the Waccasassa River, the run to Eleven Prong is less complicated.
3 Prong three: An indexed annuity that protects principal (if held to contract maturity) while offering the potential to produce more return than the traditional fixed product
Based on the Supreme Court's language, prong one involves purely legal issues: 1) whether the defendant is amenable to process in the proposed alternative forum ("availability"), and 2) whether the proposed alternative forum provides a nonillusory remedy with regard to the subject matter of the dispute ("adequacy").
Chaloult argued that the first prong had not been met because IBC had a policy requiring all supervisors to report harassment, and therefore Anderson's knowledge of the conduct could be imputed to the employer.
sources outside the words of the regarded-as prong itself-in particular,
The first prong would be to require injured illegal workers to return to their native country, where workers' comp benefits would be paid through a U.
Chrysler argued that in this case any statutory liability fixed the liability and thus satisfied the first prong of the all-events test.