pronation


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pronation

 [pro-na´shun]
the act of assuming the prone position, or the state of being prone. Applied to the hand, turning the palm backward (posteriorly) or downward, performed by medial rotation of the forearm. Applied to the foot, a combination of eversion and abduction movements taking place in the tarsal and metatarsal joints and resulting in lowering of the medial margin of the foot, hence of the longitudinal arch.
Pronation (top) versus supination (bottom).

pro·na·tion

(prō-nā'shŭn), [TA]
The condition of being prone; the act of assuming or of being placed in a prone position; a specific rotational motion of the forearm that moves the palm into a downfacing position, a specific rotational motion of the foot in which the plantar surface is rotated outward.
Synonym(s): pronatio [TA]

pronation

/pro·na·tion/ (-na´shun) the act of assuming the prone position, or the state of being prone. Applied to the hand, the act of turning the palm backward (posteriorly) or downward, performed by medial rotation of the forearm. Applied to the foot, a combination of eversion and abduction movements taking place in the tarsal and metatarsal joints and resulting in lowering of the medial margin of the foot, hence of the longitudinal arch.

pronation

[prōnā′shən]
Etymology: L, pronare, to bend forward
1 assumption of a prone position, one in which the ventral surface of the body faces downward.
2 (of the arm) the rotation of the forearm so that the palm of the hand faces downward or backward.
3 (of the foot) the lowering of the medial edge of the foot by turning it outward and through abduction in the tarsal and metatarsal joints. pronate, v.
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Pronation

pro·na·tion

(prō-nā'shŭn) [TA]
1. The condition of being prone; the act of assuming or of being placed in a prone position.
2. Transverse plane motion at the radioulnar joint or transverse tarsal joint.

pronation

The act of turning to a face down (prone) position, or of rotating the horizontal forearm so that the palm of the hand faces the ground. The opposite movements are called supination.

Pronation

The lowering or descending of the inner edge of the foot by turning the entire foot outwards.
Mentioned in: Heel Spurs

pronation,

n medial rotation of the radioulnar joint to face the palm down.
Enlarge picture
Pronation.

pronation

the plantar surface of the paw is turned to face backwards, the customary position in animals other than primates.
References in periodicals archive ?
Colaris and coworkers, (16) Shoemaker and colleagues, (19) Luhmann and associates, (20) and Flynn and Waters (14) provided organized tables that listed the pronation and supination outcome for every patient and calculated the mean or median pronation and supination loss.
This foot abnormality almost always causes over pronation.
The abbreviations FFLEX, WFLEX, WEXT, PRON and SUP in the tables stand for finger flexion, wrist flexion, wrist extension, pronation and, supination in that order.
This variable measures foot pronation as a way to quantify the strategy used by dancers to compensate for insufficient hip external rotation to achieve a proper en dehor.
In our study, 20 cases of DCP implants had the supination and pronation <[10.
Flat feet or excessive pronation can cause the expected push-off or supinated phase either to be too late or totally absent.
In the APTUS group, the range of motion achieved in radial and ulnar deviation and in pronation and supination was comparable with that of the uninjured side; however, the values for both volar and dorsal flexion were markedly lower.
Podiatrist Carol Howlett from Howlett & Dickinson says: "Running can cause many sports injuries that relate to podiatry and the lower limbs - plantar fasciitis, shin splints, pronation (foot rolling in), supination (foot foot rolling out wards) illio tibial band syndrome, ankle and foot sprains to name but a few.
The clinical objective of most foot orthoses is to reduce the foot pronation that clinicians associate with a range of musculoskeletal problems (e.
But a Danish study has found that runners who overpronate were not more likely to get hurt than those with less foot motion, reinforcing some experts' belief that pronation may not be much of a factor in injury, and that trying to limit pronation with motion control shoes could be a mistake, according to The Times.
Researchers have followed 927 healthy novice runners with different pronation types for a full year.