pronate

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pronate

 [pro´nāt]
to subject to pronation.

pro·nate

(prō'nāt),
1. To perform pronation of the forearm or foot.
2. To assume, or to be placed in, a prone position.
[L. pronatus, fr. prono, pp. -atus, to bend forward, fr. pronus, bent forward]

pronate

(prō′nāt′)
v. pro·nated, pro·nating, pro·nates
v.tr.
1.
a. To turn or rotate (the hand or forearm) so that the palm faces down or back.
b. To turn or rotate (the foot) by abduction and eversion so that the inner edge of the sole bears the body's weight.
2. To place in a prone position.
v.intr.
1. To become pronated.
2. To assume a prone position.

pro·na′tion n.

pronate

verb To turn facing downward, prone.

pro·nate

(prō'nāt)
1. To assume, or to be placed in, a prone position.
2. To perform pronation of the forearm or foot.
[L. pronatus, fr. prono, pp. -atus, to bend forward, fr. pronus, bent forward]

pronate

in humans, to turn the palm downwards or from the body to face the ground; not easily done in most animal species, except primates, dogs and cats; compare with supination.
References in periodicals archive ?
The operation will mean that Callum can walk without pain and blisters and his feet pronating it will stop him hopefully having to have bone surgery on his feet in later life.
As Laportilla explains, "This helps strengthen the weak supinating muscles and reinforces new habits of resisting the pronating movement.
In these people, the extreme flat foot has injured the deltoid ligament, a strong, flat triangular ligament that is located on the inside of the ankle that provides support to prevent the ankle from over pronating.
I have also found a correlation between low DKF and patellofemoral pain, presumably due to forced pronation, thus patellofemoral malalignment, as the advancing tibia in plie plantar flexes the talus, pronating the foot.
Despite that, I am now using orthotics due to a recent injury caused by excessive pronating.
Malunion and nonunion occur more frequently because of difficulty in reducing and maintaining the reduction of the two parallel bones in the presence of pronating and supinating muscles.
Dancers with posterior tibialis tendinitis, which is linked to pronating (flat) feet, can still learn new choreography.