prompted voiding


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voiding

 [void´ing]
prompted voiding
1. a technique of bladder training in which the patient is instructed to urinate according to a predetermined schedule, usually beginning at intervals as often as one hour to an hour and a half.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as promotion of urinary continence through the use of timed verbal toileting reminders and positive social feedback for successful toileting.

prompted voiding

a nursing intervention from the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) defined as promotion of urinary continence through the use of timed verbal toileting reminders and positive social feedback for successful toileting. See also Nursing Interventions Classification.

prompted voiding

A treatment for urinary incontinence in which patients (particularly those with limited self-awareness) are reminded to void before they urinate on themselves or are taught to seek assistance with urination periodically before an episode of incontinence occurs.

prompted voiding

Reminding patients, esp. those with cognitive impairments, to urinate at specified times in order to avoid episodic incontinence.
See also: voiding
References in periodicals archive ?
Adoption was measured with an investigator-developed chart review form using activities specified on the prompted voiding protocol as the process indicators of adoption.
The best available evidence-based bladder protocol identified for this study was a prompted voiding algorithm (Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario, 2005).
As suggested in Greenhalgh, Robert, Macfarlane, Bate, and Kyriakidou (2004), the researcher could facilitate the unit manager or a unit change champion in working with the nurses to identify the most important prompted voiding criteria to be used on their unit and provide consultation for educational meetings (individual or group workshops).
Prompted voiding protocol for individuals with urinary incontinence.
To be sure, we found excellent written materials on the topic, including journal articles and clinical practice guidelines on managing incontinence through prompted voiding.
Let's return to our hypothetical example: the search for Web-based training on prompted voiding, geared toward nurse aides.
As I said earlier, some residents won't get drier with prompted voiding.
Palmer: Prompted voiding has been researched the most, but as I said before, it's probably most appropriate for those residents who aren't very incontinent and who can go to the bathroom without assistance or who will cooperate with toileting.
Briefly, the program involved training staff to apply the prompted voiding procedure to incontinent residents and to enter assessment data and quality control check data in the computer.
For the actual training in the prompted voiding procedure, hands-on demonstration with the NAs at the resident's bedside was conducted.
The prompted voiding approach does not require computerization, but an appropriately designed computer program can help in solving many problems in implementation.
The first secret to a successful prompted voiding program is patient selection.