prolapsed cord

prolapsed cord

[prōlapst]
an umbilical cord that protrudes beside or ahead of the presenting part of the fetus.
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Prolapsed cord

Prolapsed cord

The umbilical cord is pushed into the vagina ahead of the baby and becomes compressed, cutting off blood flow to the baby.
Mentioned in: Cesarean Section
References in periodicals archive ?
But the failure of midwives at Royal Sussex County Hospital to notice a prolapsed cord led to asphyxia and cerebral palsy affecting all four of his limbs.
hospitalist is not in the operating room with a case just when they're needed for a shoulder dystocia or prolapsed cord in L&D.
When she was 27 weeks pregnant, Shaun, a joiner, rushed her into Letterkenny General Hospital with a prolapsed cord and Jamie was delivered.
By comparison, the incidence of other childbirth emergencies, such as prolapsed cord, placental separation, or sudden fetal distress is 1-3 percent.
hospitalist can begin a cesarean section for a prolapsed cord before a private practitioner can be there.
Momsen's suit maintains gross medical malpractice by the hospital and attending physicians following presentation with a prolapsed cord.
Common causes of variable decelerations include vagal reflex triggered by head compression during pushing and cord compression such as that caused by short cord, nuchal cord, body entanglement, prolapsed cord, decreased amniotic fluid, and fetal descent.
Except for acute catastrophic events such as a prolapsed cord or ruptured uterus, metabolic acidemia develops relatively slowly during labor with severe variant patterns over a period of about 1 hour.
In these women, HIE is often caused by a prolapsed cord or massive placental abruption and even under the best circumstances--in which a C-section is performed within a 15- to 20-minute window--it's next to impossible to prevent HIE completely.
These relatively rare events might be a maternal cardiac arrest, a complete abruption, or prolapsed cords with no blood flow through them.