prokaryote


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prokaryote

 [pro-kar´e-ōt]
any member of the kingdom Monera; a unicellular organism lacking a true nucleus and nuclear membrane, having genetic material composed of a single loop of naked double-stranded DNA. The microorganisms, comprising the bacteria and blue-green bacteria (formerly blue-green algae), are predominantly unicellular but may have filamentous, mycelial, or colonial forms. Prokaryotes, with the exception of genus Mycoplasma, have a rigid cell wall. adj., adj prokaryot´ic.

pro·kar·y·ote

(prō-kar'ē-ōt),
A member of the superkingdom Prokaryotae; an organismic unit consisting of a single and presumably primitive moneran cell, or a precellular organism, which lacks a nuclear membrane, paired organized chromosomes, a mitotic mechanism for cell division, microtubules, and mitochondria.
See also: Prokaryotae, Monera, eukaryote.
Synonym(s): procaryote

prokaryote

/pro·kary·ote/ (-kar´e-ōt) a unicellular organism lacking a true nucleus and nuclear membrane, having genetic material composed of a single loop of naked double-stranded DNA. Prokaryotes, with the exception of mycoplasmas, have a rigid cell wall.prokaryot´ic

prokaryote

also

procaryote

(prō-kăr′ē-ōt′)
n.
Any of various microorganisms of the domains Archaea and Bacteria, characterized by the absence of a distinct membrane-bound nucleus and membrane-bound organelles and by the simultaneous occurrence of DNA transcription and protein synthesis at the same site, in contrast to eukaryotes. Also called moneran.

pro·kar′y·ot′ic (-ŏt′ĭk) adj.

prokaryote

[prōker′ē·ōt]
Etymology: Gk, protos + karyon
a unicellular organism that does not contain a true nucleus surrounded by a double membrane; a bacterium. Division usually occurs through simple fission. Also spelled procaryote. Compare eukaryote. -prokaryotic, adj.

pro·kar·y·ote

(prō-kar'ē-ōt)
A member of the superkingdom Prokaryotae; an organism consisting of a single cell, or a precellular organism, which lacks a nuclear membrane, paired organized chromosomes, a mitotic mechanism for cell division, microtubules, and mitochondria.
See also: eukaryote
Synonym(s): procaryote.

prokaryote

or

prokaryote

any organism, including those in the domains BACTERIA or ARCHAEA, that lacks a membrane-bound nucleus and has no MITOSIS or MEIOSIS. Organelles such as the MITOCHONDRION and the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM are also lacking. Compare EUKARYOTE and See Fig. 155 .

prokaryote

a unicellular organism lacking a true nucleus and nuclear membrane, having genetic material composed of a single molecule of double-stranded DNA. Prokaryotes with the exception of mycoplasmas have a rigid cell wall. Includes the blue-green algae and bacteria—the Cyanophyceae.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, this clam is known to experience several morphological abnormalities, including warts, pustules, discoloration of the periostracum, and infectious agents such as protozoas and Rickettsia-like prokaryotes (Kent et al.
The ease with which bacteria have become resistant to a class of synthetic antibacterials is an example of the versatility of the prokaryotes.
presumed free-living green prokaryote, which in accordance with the
WT-Ribo-SPIA allows comprehensive, linear, global amplification of the total transcriptome in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes and is independent of the presence or absence of the 3' polyA tail.
In a preferred embodiment, the kinesins are produced from a prokaryote, most preferably, a bacterial cell.
Even the most basic organism, the prokaryote bacterial cell, is so detailed and sophisticated as to baffle the greatest minds.
BLAST Ring Image Generator (BRIG): simple prokaryote genome comparisons.
An actinidc archaea/ viroid mediated model of prokaryote, viral, eukaryotic, primate and human evolution is discussed.
The very name prokaryote implies that the microbes are precursors to eukaryotes--organisms that do wrap their genetic material in a nucleus and do have the organelles.
So far, it is a unique disease involving the transfer of DNA from a prokaryote into chromosomes of plant eukaryotes by mechanisms that are still incompletely known but that has permitted a new area of plant-genetic engineering leading to the production of numerous transgenic plant s as a result of gene transfer from one plant to another.
The bacteria that causes WS in abalone is a rickettsialeslike prokaryote (RLP) that has been identified as Candidatus Xenohaliotis cal(forniensis (Friedman et al.
In the first half of the 20th century, Alexander Oparin established the "Metabolism First" hypothesis to explain the origin of life, thus strengthening the primary role of cells as small drops of coacervates, which are evolutionary precursors of the first prokaryote cells.