prokaryote


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prokaryote

 [pro-kar´e-ōt]
any member of the kingdom Monera; a unicellular organism lacking a true nucleus and nuclear membrane, having genetic material composed of a single loop of naked double-stranded DNA. The microorganisms, comprising the bacteria and blue-green bacteria (formerly blue-green algae), are predominantly unicellular but may have filamentous, mycelial, or colonial forms. Prokaryotes, with the exception of genus Mycoplasma, have a rigid cell wall. adj., adj prokaryot´ic.

pro·kar·y·ote

(prō-kar'ē-ōt),
A member of the superkingdom Prokaryotae; an organismic unit consisting of a single and presumably primitive moneran cell, or a precellular organism, which lacks a nuclear membrane, paired organized chromosomes, a mitotic mechanism for cell division, microtubules, and mitochondria.
See also: Prokaryotae, Monera, eukaryote.
Synonym(s): procaryote

prokaryote

/pro·kary·ote/ (-kar´e-ōt) a unicellular organism lacking a true nucleus and nuclear membrane, having genetic material composed of a single loop of naked double-stranded DNA. Prokaryotes, with the exception of mycoplasmas, have a rigid cell wall.prokaryot´ic

prokaryote

also

procaryote

(prō-kăr′ē-ōt′)
n.
Any of various microorganisms of the domains Archaea and Bacteria, characterized by the absence of a distinct membrane-bound nucleus and membrane-bound organelles and by the simultaneous occurrence of DNA transcription and protein synthesis at the same site, in contrast to eukaryotes. Also called moneran.

pro·kar′y·ot′ic (-ŏt′ĭk) adj.

prokaryote

[prōker′ē·ōt]
Etymology: Gk, protos + karyon
a unicellular organism that does not contain a true nucleus surrounded by a double membrane; a bacterium. Division usually occurs through simple fission. Also spelled procaryote. Compare eukaryote. -prokaryotic, adj.

pro·kar·y·ote

(prō-kar'ē-ōt)
A member of the superkingdom Prokaryotae; an organism consisting of a single cell, or a precellular organism, which lacks a nuclear membrane, paired organized chromosomes, a mitotic mechanism for cell division, microtubules, and mitochondria.
See also: eukaryote
Synonym(s): procaryote.

prokaryote

or

prokaryote

any organism, including those in the domains BACTERIA or ARCHAEA, that lacks a membrane-bound nucleus and has no MITOSIS or MEIOSIS. Organelles such as the MITOCHONDRION and the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM are also lacking. Compare EUKARYOTE and See Fig. 155 .

prokaryote

a unicellular organism lacking a true nucleus and nuclear membrane, having genetic material composed of a single molecule of double-stranded DNA. Prokaryotes with the exception of mycoplasmas have a rigid cell wall. Includes the blue-green algae and bacteria—the Cyanophyceae.
References in periodicals archive ?
Early lateral transfer of genes encoding malic enzyme, acetyl-CoA synthetase and alcohol dehydrogenases from anaerobic prokaryotes to Entamoeba histolytica.
Intracellular prokaryotes in rumen ciliate protozoa: detection by confocal laser scanning microscopy after in sito hybridization with fluorescent 16S rRNA probes.
In prokaryotes, the helix-turn-helix motif is the most common element in the DNAbinding domain.
The origin of viruses, prokaryotes, eukaryotes, primates and humans from the initial isoprenoid organism derived actinidic archaea is discussed.
For practical purposes prokaryote is still useful, says William "Barny" Whitman, a microbiologist at the University of Georgia in Athens.
prochlorophytes and indeed compared with most other prokaryote cells,
These organisms are all single celled but are more like eukaryotes than prokaryotes in a variety of ways; many are extremophiles that live in environments that once had been thought to be incompatible with life.
Within the five-kingdom scheme, all multicellular plants, animals (including humans), and fungi, as well as the single-celled protozoa, are within the super-kingdom of eukaryotes; only the bacteria are prokaryotes.
Even the most basic organism, the prokaryote bacterial cell, is so detailed and sophisticated as to baffle the greatest minds.
BLAST ring image generator (BRIG): simple prokaryote genome comparisons.
At present, the most widely accepted theory is that mitochondria derive from a bacterium that was engulfed by an archaeon (plural = archaea), a kind of prokaryote that looks similar to a bacterium but has many molecular differences.