projective identification


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projective identification

a defensive attribution of one's own psychic processes to another person.

projective identification

Psychiatry The projection of an emotion or personality trait–with which the person is uncomfortable–onto another person–eg, a child, as in the Munchausen-by-proxy syndrome. See Munchausen-by-proxy syndrome.

pro·jec·tive i·den·ti·fi·ca·tion

(prŏ-jek'tiv ī-den'ti-fi-kā'shŭn)
A defensive attribution of one's own psychic processes to another person.
References in periodicals archive ?
The unconscious mechanisms include projective identification.
Klein's texts, with their descriptions of fragmented body parts and infants who fantasize about scooping out and destroying maternal bodies, her warring worlds of internal objects, personality split into bits, and fears expelled through projective identification, often read like science-fiction novels.
Based on Bion's theory of mental pain and projective identification we will show that the damnation of mental pain and its communication entered within Christian community experience due to social and group dynamic pressing toward the control of the free communication of pain experience.
In a twofold process of projective identification and counter-transference, the therapist incarnates as the client's highly critical father.
PASEO: RIVALRY, THE ANXIETY OF INFLUENCE, AND PROJECTIVE IDENTIFICATION
Projection and projective identification are unconscious defense mechanisms which are frequently used between bonded couples, and these defenses can cause much anger and misunderstanding.
argues that dissociation perfuses everyday life, and can be particularly illuminated by the psychological processes of dreams, projective identification, and enactments.
This sounds like a massive case of projective identification to me.
Projective identification, another defense mechanism, may induce an individual to falsely attribute to others his or her own unacceptable feelings, impulses or thoughts.
Those who lash out in violence as a result of projective identification, says Ciaramicoli, tend to share several psychological traits.
Projective identification is a defense whereby the patient projects bad internal feelings onto the staff, and staff members, failing to recognize the patient's unconscious dynamics, react in such a manner that they unwittingly feed into the patient's bad internal feelings.
Since the artist's first shows at Pat Hearn's East Village space in the early 1980s, his lugubrious homage to European masters has channeled not the distanced criticality of appropriation, but the boundaryless bond of projective identification.