prognosticate

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Related to prognosticators: reinvigorated, outlined, scrutinised, overhyped

prognosticate

 [prog-nos´tĭ-kāt]
to give a prognosis; called also prognose.

prog·nos·ti·cate

(prog-nos'ti-kāt),
To give a prognosis.
Synonym(s): prognose

prognosticate

[prognos′tikāt]
Etymology: Gk, pro, before, gnosis, knowledge
to forecast or predict from facts, present indications, or signs, such as the course a disease may take and the final outcome.

prognosticate

verb To project the outcome of a particular condition based on prior outcomes of similar cases.

prognosticate

Prognose verb To project the outcome of a particular condition or state

prog·nos·ti·cate

(prog-nos'ti-kāt)
To give a prognosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
There's a lot more to both players than celebrity prognosticators overawed by their physical prowess recognise.
Y) agreed that physicians are poor prognosticators about death and noted that they often refer patients too late to hospice care.
manufacturers and the American foundry industry successfully squashed the thoughts of prognosticators who felt that the U.
Whether prognosticators forecast riches or bankruptcy for Web sites, few say exactly when their predictions will transpire.
And for nearly every year, those prognosticators have been proven wrong.
We are now in the midst of our revolutionary "paperless offices," which, according to prognosticators in the 1980s, were to be in place by the year 2000.
Volume may increase if prognosticators prove to be right about the growth of Internet penetration in the region.
The roil of chemical reactions that turns dead plants and animals into oil can thwart even the best prognosticators.
Prognosticators see unlimited prospects for Web applications; Investors can't wait to pump dollars into any venture that appears to tap the Web in some new way.
He consults various prognosticators, allowing Rabelais to hold forth on sex, love, and marriage, and to satirize fortune tellers, judges, and poets.
An ever-increasing flood of federal regulations has washed over the nursing home industry in the last decade, and the new political climate has industry prophets, prognosticators and futurists predicting that more regulations are on the way.
Those prognosticators who question the science of all this are missing the point," said club officer Michael Johnston.