progenitive


Also found in: Dictionary, Legal.

progenitive

[-jen′itiv]
Etymology: Gk, pro, before, genein, to produce
capable of producing offspring; reproductive.
References in periodicals archive ?
This has the character of a general sexual--indeed I can say a non-differentiated libidinal-aggressive potency whose foremost traditional expressions were in warfare and progenitive hetero-sexual relations consummated in fatherhood.
I think Jamison (1996: 109) is quite right in seeing sexual and progenitive significance in this detail.
But, as mentioned above, in designating Yom Tov Levy as the first known ancestor of a familial line of just Men, Schwarz-Bart critically alters the actual Hasidic legend, which does not include this progenitive aspect in its Talmudic origins.
Darwin's words: "It may well be that it would take hundreds of generations for the progenitive instinct to develop in this way, but if it should do so, nature would have taken her revenge, and the variety Homo contracipiens would become extinct and would be replaced by the variety Homo progenitivus.
but that Grandfather would have descendants, the right descendants; maybe He had foreseen already the descendants Grandfather would have, maybe He saw already in Grandfather the seed progenitive of the three generations He saw it would take to set at least some of His lowly people free.
A progenitive failure, jealous of his king, he is now exposed as having repeated Satan's act of having spawned Sin in his generating rebellion against lawful order and his king.
This simply means that generalizations about music cannot be made without serious and methodical scrutiny of its progenitive culture.
Framed as a figure "no bigger than a doll [and] as impervious as an effigy of bronze," Raby is the maternal muse "musing" as she passes through the progenitive stages of art to become "the old negress [in] the window upstairs": "She came through fire and she leaned for a moment in the window, her hands on the burning ledge, looking no bigger than a doll, as impervious as an effigy of bronze, serene, dynamic, musing in the foreground of Holocaust.
While these Select poets are valued for their progenitive contributions to the English literary gene pool, "the uneducated poets" are decisively limited in their access to it; they have, according to Southey, little knowledge of the literary tradition and are not allowed to contribute to it.