professor

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A member of the faculty at an institution of higher learning who has attained its highest possible academic rank and possesses special knowledge in an occupation requiring special skills

professor

Academia A member of the faculty at an institution of higher learning who has attained its highest possible academic rank, who possesses special knowledge in an occupation requiring special skills. See 'Chair. '. Cf, Lecturer.
References in periodicals archive ?
establishes the other bookend, treating these memoir texts as a new genre (although one with deep roots) that not only demonstrates the reflexivity of the Russian professoriate in action but also marks the same instinct to paper over discontinuity characteristic of university histories in general.
The first theme is disdain, a cultural denigration of the "lower classes" by the interest public (2)--those "who write the books and do the social analysis" (3)--who populate the professoriate.
The subtitle of Scholarship Reconsidered is thus timely and poignant: "priorities of the professoriate.
Similarly, perhaps the 10-year cutoff point for professoriate experience in counselor education was not a strong enough variable to capture differences.
From the rise of the research university and the proliferation of secular colleges in the late 19th century to the Progressive--and New Deal-era enthusiasm for melding scientific research with social reform; from the postwar McCarthyist worry that there was a communist behind every lectern to the campus unrest of the 1960s, the American professoriate has for over a century been "imprinted" anew as a guild for theologically and politically liberal thinkers.
102) Today's professoriate routinely encounter the latter values as students demand grade changes, insist on access at all times of day or night, and refuse to accept anything less than an A for work they may not have done (Sacks, 1996)
Writing from the perspective of tenured faculty member and former dean, Donna Palmateer Pennee encourages the professoriate to pay renewed attention to their service responsibilities within the institution, noting that it is through a responsible attitude toward service that we confirm our professional autonomy.
Fain remarked that as members of AATC, it is our call to ask of our institutions and colleagues "how we ought" to work in higher education and within the professoriate to be different from all of the other professions.
The professoriate may prefer to live in rarefied enclaves of "knowledge creation," but that doesn't mean it's a good idea.
From fewer tenure-track positions being available to court intervention of academic behavior, the professoriate is faced with "scrutiny and a widening misunderstanding" (Finkelstein, 2001, 324), particularly as it relates to faculty.
Anthony Stewart and Reg Whitaker have noted, that the Canadian professoriate does not "look like" Canadian society or even the student body: it is more white and male than either.
An idea for a book and a call for manuscripts followed, and the result is a collection of thirteen moving, beautifully written autobiographical essays, each charting a unique, usually roundabout path from working class conditions to the professoriate.