proestrogen

proestrogen

 [pro-es´tro-jen]
a substance without estrogenic activity but which is metabolized in the body to active estrogen.

pro·es·tro·gen

(prō-es'trō-jen),
A substance that acts as an estrogen only after it has been metabolized in the body to an active compound.

proestrogen

/pro·es·tro·gen/ (-es´trah-jen) a substance without estrogenic activity but able to be metabolized in the body to active estrogen.

pro·es·tro·gen

(prō-es'trŏ-jen)
A substance that acts as an estrogen only after it has been metabolized in the body to an active compound.
Synonym(s): pro-oestrogen.

pro·es·tro·gen

(prō-es'trŏ-jen)
Substance that acts as an estrogen only after it has been metabolized in the body to an active compound.

proestrogen

a substance without estrogenic activity but which is metabolized in the body to active estrogen.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, it was recently discovered that isoxanthohumol, another hop-derived prenylflavonoid that is usually present in much larger quantities, can act as proestrogen as it can be metabolized into 8-PN by the intestinal microbiota (Possemiers et al.
Both the relatively small sample scale and factors affecting the bioavailability may have contributed to the absence of a clear dose-response relationship, as large interindividual differences in metabolic activation of the proestrogen IX to 8-PN exist in a typical menopausal population (Bolca et al.
Further, methoxychlor is a proestrogen that requires demethylation by liver microsomal mixed function oxidase in animals before eliciting estrogenic activity (Kupfer and Bulger 1987; Stresser and Kupfer 1998).
Further, methoxychlor, trans-stilbene, benzophenone, and benzo[a]pyrene are proestrogens that require metabolic activation by liver microsomal mixed-function oxidase in animals (Charles et al.
Metabolic activation of the proestrogens trans-stilbene and trans-stilbene oxide by rat liver microsomes.
Also, it is unclear to what degree proestrogens may, or may not, be activated to their estrogenic form in cultured cells.