prodrome

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prodrome

 [pro´drōm]
a premonitory symptom; a symptom indicating the onset of a disease. adj., adj prodro´mal, prodro´mic.

pro·drome

(prō'drōm), The correct plural of this word is prodromes, not prodromata.
An early or premonitory symptom of a disease.
Synonym(s): prodromus
[G. prodromos, a running before, fr. pro- + dromos, a running, a course]

prodrome

/pro·drome/ (pro´drōm) a premonitory symptom; a symptom indicating the onset of a disease.prodro´malprodro´mic

prodrome

(prō′drōm′)
n.
An early symptom indicating the onset of an attack or a disease.

pro·dro′mal (-drō′məl), pro·drom′ic (-drŏm′ĭk) adj.

prodrome

[prō′drōm]
Etymology: Gk, prodromos, running before
1 an early sign of a developing condition or disease.
2 the earliest phase of a developing condition or disease. Many infectious diseases such as chickenpox or measles are most contagious during the prodromal period. prodromal, adj.

prodrome

Medtalk A premonitory or early Sx of a disease or a disorder Neurology A premonitory Sx unrelated to a seizure  Cf Aura.

pro·drome

(prō'drōm)
An early or premonitory symptom of a disease.

prodrome

A symptom or sign that precedes the start of a disease and gives early warning. KOPLIK'S SPOTS are a prodrome of MEASLES and the AURA is a prodrome of an epileptic seizure or an attack of MIGRAINE.

Prodrome

A symptom or group of symptoms that appears shortly before an acute attack of illness. The term comes from a Greek word that means "running ahead of."

pro·drome

(prō'drōm)
Early or premonitory symptom of a disease.

prodrome (prō´drōm),

n a symptom, often noted prior to monitoring and diagnosis that may signal the beginning of a disease.

prodrome

a premonitory clinical sign; a clinical sign indicating the onset of a disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is essential to further research the role played by anhedonia, both physical and social, in genetic, prodromic and psychometric high-risk studies, examining its relation with other neuropsychological and brain characteristics (Orlova et al.
pseudotuberculosis is an emerging pathogen in HIV patients and remind us that septicemia in these patients can exist without prodromic symptoms.
The prodromic phase of the lesions was characterized primarily by erythema.