proctoscopy


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

proctoscopy

 [prok-tos´kah-pe]
inspection of the rectum with a proctoscope. The examination is usually done prior to rectal surgery, and it may be a part of the physical examination of a patient with hemorrhoids, rectal bleeding, or other symptoms of a rectal disorder.

proc·tos·co·py

(prok-tos'kŏ-pē),
Visual examination of the rectum and anus, as with a proctoscope.
Synonym(s): rectoscopy

proctoscopy

[proktos′kəpē]
the examination of the rectum with an endoscope inserted through the anus.

proctoscopy

Anoscopy GI disease Examination of the anorectal mucosa with a proctoscope inserted per rectum to detect neoplasms or other lesions which are biopsied and sent to pathology. See Colonoscopy, Endoscopy, Sigmoidoscopy. Cf Barium enema, Fecal occult blood test.

proc·tos·co·py

(prok-tos'kŏ-pē)
Visual examination of the rectum and anus, as with a proctoscope.

proctoscopy

Direct visual examination of the ANUS and RECTUM either by means of a short rigid metal tube (a proctoscope) or by using a flexible, fibreoptic ENDOSCOPE. Both are inserted through the anus.

Proctoscopy

A procedurein which a thin tube containing a camera and a light is inserted into the rectum so that the doctor can visually inspect it.
Mentioned in: Proctitis

proctoscopy

inspection of the rectum with a proctoscope. The examination is usually done prior to rectal surgery or as part of the physical examination of a patient with rectal bleeding, stricture or other signs of a rectal disorder.
References in periodicals archive ?
2 Severity of Mild 66 60 Bleeding Moderate 29 36 Severe 5 4 Associated Anal pain 18 16 Symptoms Constipation 34 37 Diarrhoea 1 3 Pruritus ani 22 18 Mucous 20 18 discharge Haemorrhoids on 1st degree 18 23 Proctoscopy 2nd degree 82 77 Table-2: Statistical Analysis of Relief of Bleeding in Both Groups according to the Day of Follow-Up Week of RBL Group Daflon Group P Value Follow-up 1st week 60 82 <0.
At 3 months and one year, the success of the treatment was assessed by noting the occurrence of bleeding and prolapse through proctoscopy.
In 1997, respondents were asked if they had received a sigmoidoscopy or proctoscopy.
Other endoscopic procedures and their targets include: bronchoscopy (trachea); colonoscopy (colon and large intestine); laryngoscopy (larynx); proctoscopy (rectum and lower colon); otoscopy (inner ear); cytoscopy (bladder and urinary tract); and gastroscopy (upper gastrointestinal tract).
Proctoscopy is performed with a shorter instrument than sigmoidoscope and is not recommended as a colorectal cancer screening test.
Findings from CDC's state based Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System indicated that in 1997, only 41% of adults aged 50 and older had ever had a sigmoidoscopy or proctoscopy (an earlier and now less frequently used procedure) for screening or diagnostic purposes, and only 29% of respondents reported having had one within the past 5 years.
These are: taking a blood sample, proctoscopy, electrocardiogram, erythrocytes sedimentation rate (ESR) measurement, urine microscopy, removing ear wax, removing corpora aliena (with two specifications), and bladder catheterization.
Evidence for efficacy is based on a large uncontrolled trial of rigid proctoscopy involving over 85,000 patient years of experience.
A digital anorectal examination and proctoscopy were sufficient to establish the diagnosis in approximately 90% of the patients.
All the patients included in the study underwent detailed rectal exam bydigital rectal exam and proctoscopy, in order to rule out any abnormality of anal canal.