ergasiophobia

(redirected from procrastination)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Wikipedia.

er·ga·si·o·pho·bi·a

(er-gas'ē-ō-fō'bē-ă),
Aversion to work of any kind.
[G. ergasia, work, + phobos, fear]

ergasiophobia

(ĕr-gā″sē-ō-fō′bē-ă) [″ + phobos, fear]
Abnormal dislike for work of any kind or for assuming responsibility.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Procrastination has been found to be quite prevalent phenomenon in the general population that chronically affects a substantial portion of adults as well as university students (Blunt and Pychyl, 1998).
Though low conscientiousness is a strong predictor of both behavioral procrastination and indecision (Steel, 2010; van Eerde, 2003), other traits differ.
If one has an original idea, the key lesson is not to rush instantly, but procrastination gives us flexibility and the time to learn to adapt and reduce risks, Grant says.
Over time, people can break the habit of procrastination and become more efficient and successful.
When we write that procrastination is a side effect of the way we value things, it frames task completion as a product of motivation, rather than ability.
According to the research of Watson [16], there is a positive relation between procrastination and avoidant orientation while there is a negative relation between procrastination and tending orientation.
Nowadays, it is noticeable that many students easily give up on their life and accept failure leading to frustration thus affecting their self-regulation and decision-making and therefore, students' preferred behavioral styles such as procrastination.
For them procrastination is a lifestyle cutting across all domains of their life.
Grant explains that historically, there were actually two ways people talked about procrastination.
The wages of sin may be death, but the wages of procrastination are long lines.