procoagulant

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procoagulant

 [pro″co-ag´u-lant]
1. tending to promote coagulation.
2. a precursor of a natural substance necessary to coagulation of the blood.

procoagulant

/pro·co·ag·u·lant/ (-ko-ag´ūl-int)
1. tending to promote coagulation.
2. a precursor of a natural substance necessary to coagulation of the blood.

procoagulant

(prō′kō-ăg′yə-lənt)
n.
1. The precursor of any of various blood factors necessary for coagulation.
2. An agent that promotes the coagulation of blood.

procoagulant

[-kō·ag′yələnt]
an inactive coagulation protein that becomes activated during the coagulation process to form a serine protease or cofactor and produce a fibrin clot. Prothrombin is an example.

procoagulant

adjective Favoring coagulation; referring to activation of coagulation factors noun Any agent–eg, thrombin, factor Xa, which clots blood

procoagulant

1. tending to promote coagulation.
2. a precursor of a natural substance necessary to coagulation of the blood.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first, represented by the procoagulant factors, is triggered by tissue factor (TF), (3) a cellular receptor in damaged tissues that forms a complex with activated factor VII (FVIIa) at the site of injury (Fig.
Anticancer drugs can provoke the release of procoagulants and cytokines from damaged tumor cells and direct alterations on vascular endothelium.
The PT and aPTT are therefore responsive to thrombin generated as a function of procoagulants, but much less responsive to thrombin inhibition by the natural anticoagulants, especially Protein C.
Procoagulants have been found in brain tumors and a release of thromboplastin from degenerating neural tissue has been observed.
Thrombin generation in TF-activated plasma requires the presence of procoagulant phospholipid membranes for the assembly of thrombin-generating enzyme complexes (17).
Normal hemostasis is a complex interaction of platelets, blood vessels, and the procoagulant and fibrinolytic proteins.
The area under the curve of thrombin generation recorded over time (also called thrombin potential) ultimately depends on the balance between procoagulants and anticoagulants (78).
Coagulation factors, or procoagulants, are activated sequentially, and a fibrin clot is formed, which slows and ultimately stops blood flow.
Blood hemostasis is affected by platelets by adhering to the sites of vascular injury, releasing compounds from their granules, aggregating together to form hemostatic platelet plug and providing procoagulant surface on their phospholipid membrane to arrest bleeding [4].
The endothelium, which is normally anticoagulant and antithrombotic in the resting state, changes to a procoagulant surface, and the balance of the hemostatic system shifts towards hypercoagulability.