privacy


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pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē),
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, respect for the confidential nature of the therapist-patient relationship.

privacy

[prī′vəsē]
a culturally specific concept defining the degree of one's personal responsibility to others in regulating behavior that is regarded as intrusive. Some privacy-regulating mechanisms are physical barriers (closed doors or drawn curtains, such as around a hospital bed) and interpersonal types (lowered voices or cessation of smoking).
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Privacy curtains help ensure patient's privacy

privacy

Seclusion, freedom from disturbance or interference. Privacy has two intertwined components in the context of healthcare:
(1) The patient’s rights and expectations that personal health information is shared only between professionals who need it to manage the patient; in the UK access to such information is monitored by the provider’s Caldicott Guardian; and
(2) The physical space, clothing and other measures taken to ensure that the private conversations remain so, and that patients’ dignity is preserved and embarrassment minimised by providing appropriate clothing.

Pronunciation
Medspeak-UK: pronounced, PRIV uh see
Medspeak-US: pronounced, PRY vuh see

privacy

NIHspeak Control over the extent, timing, and circumstances of sharing oneself–physically, behaviorally, or intellectually with others

pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē)
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, respect for the confidential nature of the therapist-patient relationship.

pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē)
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, but also in all fields of dentistry and health care, respect for confidential nature of the clinician-patient relationship.

privacy,

n a culturally specific concept defining the degree of one's personal responsibility to others in regulating behavior that is regarded as intrusive.

Patient discussion about privacy

Q. I am upset by the lack of privacy at dialysis centers. Does anyone see their nephrologist in private office? My nephrologist comes to see me and examine me while I am receiving dialysis. I understand his talking to me but the exam is objectionable and I am unable to ask personal questions because everyone is listening. I am told they are all old and don't hear us but that is patronizing and extremely rude. Are there rules against this? Why can't we have office visits where there is some privacy?

A. I live in Sault Ste Marie Ontario Canada and if you need to ask personal questions you can make an appointment to see your doctor in the clinic.
But when I was in Calgary Alberta they would make you a appointment every 3 months to see the doctor.

More discussions about privacy
References in periodicals archive ?
A group called Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering (CASPIAN) has sprung up for the sole purpose of condemning supermarket discount cards.
If these routine affronts to privacy weren't enough to stoke paranoia among the anonymous multitudes, the Patriot Act has law enforcement agog with a developing prurient interest in our reading habits and political activities.
Online privacy has been part of the AICPA/CICA Trust Services, which also includes a core set of principles and criteria covering security, processing integrity, availability and confidentiality.
Concerns about privacy can prevent adolescents from seeking care.
The administration did not inform the nation when it eliminated every individual's right to consent to the release of his/her medical records in a few sentences buried deep within the amendments to the privacy rule.
And for reporters and researchers looking for more information, a list of privacy experts inside and outside the NCC, with contact information, complements the news and in-depth studies.
YOU HAVE NO PRIVACY anymore," said Sun Microsystems CEO Scott McNealy.
The study, the first to compare the corporate privacy practices of comparable Canadian and U.
Given the increasing pressure for companies to be accountable for the content of their privacy policies, and responsive to new laws, regulations and business imperatives within their sectors, companies will find this a useful, unique and inexpensive tool," said Dr.
Insurers will face continuing regulatory compliance challenges on the privacy front in coming months.
Included is a discussion of a recent governmental enactment to limit the liability of certain telecommunications service providers (TSPs) for content posted on their networks, efforts to regulate the transmission of spam, and proposed privacy measures and consumer protection laws.